Perceptions of Parental Involvement and Support as Predictors of College Students’ Persistence in a Science Curriculum

Perceptions of Parental Involvement and Support as Predictors of College Students’ Persistence in a Science Curriculum

Perceptions of Parental Involvement and Support as Predictors of College Students’ Persistence in a Science Curriculum

Perceptions of Parental Involvement and Support as Predictors of College Students’ Persistence in a Science Curriculums

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Référence bibliographique [3479]

Ratelle, Catherine F., Larose, Simon, Guay, Frédéric et Senécal, Caroline. 2005. «Perceptions of Parental Involvement and Support as Predictors of College Students’ Persistence in a Science Curriculum ». Journal of Family Psychology, vol. 19, no 2, p. 286-293.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The goal of this study was to examined the dynamic interplay between family and personal determinants of persistence in a college science program. » (p. 286)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« The goal of the present study was to test a model of persistence in science that posits that perceived parental involvement and support predict persistence in science over time because they promote students’ feelings of autonomy, competence, and relatedness at school. » (p. 287)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
729 jeunes adultes (373 femmes et 356 hommes) de secondaire 5

Instruments :
Questionnaire comprenant plusieurs échelles :
- Réussite en sciences;
- Perceived Parental Autonomy Support (Paulson et al., 1994; Robinson et al., 1995);
- Perceived Parental Involvement (Barnes et al., 1992);
- Perceived Competence Scale (Losier et al., 1993);
- Academic Motivation Scale (AMS, Vallerand et al., 1989);
- Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (Baker et al., 1989);
- Persistence in program.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« As technological and scientific skills are increasingly needed, finding that science students encounter significant problems in their academic program causes serious concern. The authors examined how perceived parental involvement and support predict college students’ persistence in science based on J. P. Connell and J. G. Wellborn’s (1991) theoretical model: Perceived parental involvement and support should foster student persistence by promoting students’ competence, autonomy, and relatedness. Results suggest that perceived parental autonomy supports predicted scientific persistence partly through students’ autonomy. Perceived parental involvement, although unrelated to persistence, was a significant predictor of autonomy and relatedness. Results suggest that perceived parental involvement and support have specific roles in predicting student self-processes and achievement, highlighting the importance of sustaining parents’ contribution for college students. » (p. 286)