Are Laterborns more Innovative and Nonconforming Consumers than Firstborns? A Darwinian Perspective

Are Laterborns more Innovative and Nonconforming Consumers than Firstborns? A Darwinian Perspective

Are Laterborns more Innovative and Nonconforming Consumers than Firstborns? A Darwinian Perspective

Are Laterborns more Innovative and Nonconforming Consumers than Firstborns? A Darwinian Perspectives

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Référence bibliographique [3450]

Saad, Gad, Gill, Tripat et Nataraajan, Rajan. 2005. «Are Laterborns more Innovative and Nonconforming Consumers than Firstborns? A Darwinian Perspective ». Journal of Business Research, vol. 58, no 7, p. 902-909.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In [this article], some of the key tenets of the Darwinian-based paradigms for understanding the effects of birth order on personality are briefly reviewed. Then, the paucity of research on birth order in the marketing literature is highlighted. Subsequently, a study is presented wherein birth order is used to explore differences along certain key consumption-related psychometric scales that measure innovative or risk-associated behaviors/attitudes (e.g., product innovativeness scale). » (p. 903)
« The main objective of this exploratory study was to gauge the effect of birth order on several consumption related psychometric scales related to openness. Marketing scales that might be measuring constructs corresponding to consumers’ ’openness to new experiences’ or ‘risk taking’ in the marketplace were selected. » (p. 904)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The survey was administered at a southern U.S. university. It was distributed in-class to 333 undergraduate students (49% were females, median age was 21 years, and 98% of the respondents were between the ages of 21 and 24 years). [...] [T]he final sample resulted in a total of 307 usable surveys. » (p. 905)

Instruments :
« A total of six scales were ultimately selected to explore the relationship between a consumer’s birth order and his/her score on each of these six constructs. The scales were (1) attitude toward branded products (ATBP; Moschis, 1978), (2) brand switcher (Raju, 1980), (3) comparison shopping (Hawes and Lumpkin, 1984; Lumpkin, 1985), (4) innovativeness (fashion; Hawes and Lumpkin, 1984; Lumpkin, 1985), (5) innovativeness (product; Oliver and Bearden, 1985), and (6) interpersonal influence susceptibility (IIS; normative; Bearden et al., 1989). » (p. 904)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The current study yielded results congruent with Sulloway’s Darwinian-based framework (Sulloway, 1996). Specifically, laterborns were more open to product innovations than were firstborns (supported directionally overall and significant at P < .05 for sibship = 3), a result in line with the finding of Sulloway that laterborns are more receptive to scientific innovations. Furthermore, firstborns more so than laterborns, were more susceptible to interpersonal (normative) influences in their purchase decisions, a result consistent with the findings of Sulloway that firstborns are more conforming and more identifying with the status quo. The latter results support the assertion of Sulloway (1995, 1996, 2001) that birth order is an important variable in assessing personality-based individual differences, and particularly so when openness is the dimension under investigation. » (p. 907)