Neglectful Behavior by Parents in the Life History of University Students in 17 Countries and its Relations to Violence Against Dating Partners

Neglectful Behavior by Parents in the Life History of University Students in 17 Countries and its Relations to Violence Against Dating Partners

Neglectful Behavior by Parents in the Life History of University Students in 17 Countries and its Relations to Violence Against Dating Partners

Neglectful Behavior by Parents in the Life History of University Students in 17 Countries and its Relations to Violence Against Dating Partnerss

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Référence bibliographique [3415]

Straus, Murray A. et Savage, Sarah A. 2005. «Neglectful Behavior by Parents in the Life History of University Students in 17 Countries and its Relations to Violence Against Dating Partners ». Child Maltreatment, vol. 10, no 2, p. 124-135.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This article is intended to provide some of the needed cross-cultural data. The first objective is to test the theory that most widespread effects of neglect manifest themselves when the children are adults and are in the form of psychological damage and impaired social relationships (National Research Council, 1993). A second objective is to provide preliminary information on the extent to which neglectful behavior occurs in the diverse social settings in which students at the 33 universities in 17 countries are living. A third objective is to examine the interaction of the level of violence in a given social context on the relation between neglect experienced and violence against a dating partner. » (p. 124)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« 1. The more neglectful behavior the students in this study experienced as a child, the more likely they were to engage in violence against a dating partner.
2. In social contexts where neglect is prevalent, there is a closer link between experiencing neglect and violence against a dating partner than in social contexts where fewer children have been neglected.
3. In social contexts where violence against a dating partner is more prevalent, there is a closer link between experiencing neglect and violence against a dating partner than in social contexts where violence against a dating partner is less prevalent. » (p. 131)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
9069 étudiants universitaires provenant de 33 campus répartis dans 17 pays : Allemagne (Fribourg), Australie (Adélaide), Belgique (Flemish), Brésil (Sao Paulo), Canada (Hamilton, London, Montréal, Toronto, Winnipeg), Chine (Hong-Kong), Corée (Pusan), États-Unis (Indiana, Louisiane, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvanie, Texas, Utah, Washington DC), Grande-Bretagne (Écosse), Inde (Pune), Israël (Emekzyrl), Mexique (Juarez), Nouvelle-Zélande (Christchurch), Pays-Bas (Amsterdam), Portugal (Braga), Singapour, Suisse (française et allemande).

Instruments :
« - Measure of Neglectful Behavior: Neglectful behavior was measured by the short form of the Adult-Recall version of the Multidimensional Neglectful Behavior Scale (Straus, Kinard, & Williams, 1995). This version of the scale asks adolescents or adults if their parents engaged in each of a list of neglectful behaviors.
-Measures of Violence Against a Dating Partner: The revised Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2). Physical assault and injury were measured by the CTS2 (Straus, Hamby, Boney-McCoy, & Sugarman, 1996). » (p. 128-129)
Des caractéristiques personnelles ont aussi été prises en compte : le genre, l’âge, la durée des relations, ainsi que la désirabilité sociale.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This article reports the prevalence of neglectful behavior by parents of university students in 17 nations (6 in Europe, 2 in North America, 2 in Latin America, 5 in Asia, Australia, and New Zealand) and tests the hypothesis that neglect is a risk factor for violence against a dating partner. The percentage at each university who experienced neglectful behavior ranged from 3.2% to 36% (median 12%) and the percentage who perpetrated violence against dating partners ranged from 15% to 45% (median 28%). Multilevel modeling found that the more neglectful behavior experienced as a child, the greater the probability of assaulting and injuring a dating partner and that the link between experiencing neglect and perpetrating violence is stronger at universities in which dating violence is more prevalent. Efforts to help parents avoid neglectful behavior can make an important contribution to primary prevention of partner violence and probably also other forms of child maltreatment. » (p. 124)