Couples’ Reports of Relationship Problems in a Naturalistic Therapy Setting

Couples’ Reports of Relationship Problems in a Naturalistic Therapy Setting

Couples’ Reports of Relationship Problems in a Naturalistic Therapy Setting

Couples’ Reports of Relationship Problems in a Naturalistic Therapy Settings

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Référence bibliographique [340]

Boisvert, Marie-Michèle, Wright, John, Tremblay, Nadine et McDuff, Pierre. 2011. «Couples’ Reports of Relationship Problems in a Naturalistic Therapy Setting ». Family Journal, vol. 19, no 4, p. 362-368.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The authors aim «[…] to address the limitations in the existing literature and to improve therapists’ understanding of couples’ relationship problems […].» (p. 363)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The participants in this study were 108 heterosexual couples seeking CT [couple therapy] at a fee-for-service clinic in the Montréal, Québec (Canada) area between February 2008 and February 2010.» (p. 364)

Instruments :
- Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS; Spanier, 1976) (french-language version)
- Target Complaints measure (Battle et al., 1966)
- Classification of Therapeutic Mandates Questionnaire (Poitras-Wright & St-Père, 2004)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results presented here identify the relationship problems most frequently reported by couples seeking therapy in a naturalistic setting and illustrate the relevance of carefully identifying distinct and clinically representative therapeutic mandates in CT research and practice. The most common relationship problems reported by the couples in our study were general communication problems, problems with emotional affection or distance, problems in specific areas of the current relationship, and lack of physical affection or sex. These results are consistent with previous studies about relationship problems and provide researchers and therapists practicing in naturalistic settings a comprehensive portrait of the type of problems reported by couples seeking therapy. One important finding was that one in every four couples in our study was pursuing an ambivalence resolution mandate. This finding suggests that it is important to include ambivalence resolution as a possible therapeutic mandate to accommodate couples that may not respond to a traditional alleviation of distress mandate.» (p. 366)