Anxiety about Food Supply in Cree Women with Infants in Quebec

Anxiety about Food Supply in Cree Women with Infants in Quebec

Anxiety about Food Supply in Cree Women with Infants in Quebec

Anxiety about Food Supply in Cree Women with Infants in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [3349]

Willows, Noreen D., Iserhoff, Rose, Napash, Lily, Leclerc, Lucie et Verrall, Tanya. 2005. «Anxiety about Food Supply in Cree Women with Infants in Quebec ». International Journal of Circumpolar Health, vol. 64, no 1, p. 55-64.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The objectives were to document the prevalence of maternal anxiety about food supply in Cree women who had 9-month-old infants, and to understand maternal and infant characteristics associated with anxiety. » (p. 55)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« 245 woman-infant pairs participated. » (p. 55)
« The study took place in nine Cree communities in northern Quebec. » (p. 55)

Instruments :
Sondage et questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« In this study, we documented the prevalence of anxiety about food supply in Cree mothers with infants, and examined maternal and infant characteristics associated with maternal anxiety about being unable to provide food for children. We also documented the price of infant foods and the cost to bottle-feed an infant in Cree communities compared to Montreal, which is a large urban city in the province of Quebec. » (p. 56-57)
Results have shown that « [o]ne-fifth (20.8%) of mothers were anxious about food supply. The prevalences of anxiety in women who had anemia, or smoked, during pregnancy, or who bottle-fed their 9-month-old infants, were 44.4%, 27.5% and 24.0%, respectively. The corresponding prevalences of anxiety in women who did not have anemia, who did not smoke, or who breastfed without bottle-feeding at 9-months postpartum, were 19.0%, 13.6% and 6.7%. The adjusted ORs for anxiety were 3.10 (95% CI, 1.11-8.65), 2.12 (95% CI, 1.05-4.29) and 3.87 (95% CI, 1.12-13.36) for anemia, smoking and bottle-feeding, respectively. Prevalences of anemia and infection were comparable between infants of mothers who did and did not express anxiety. However, infants whose mothers had anemia during pregnancy had higher prevalences of anemia (44.0% vs. 24.6%, p = 0.04) and infection (77.8% vs. 50.2%, p = 0.03) at 9 months old. [...] Women who had anxiety about food supply for their children had characteristics that distinguished them from women who did not have anxiety. Anxiety was associated with anemia and smoking during pregnancy, and with bottle-feeding at 9 months postpartum. » (p. 55)