Changing Families: Relationships in Context

Changing Families: Relationships in Context

Changing Families: Relationships in Context

Changing Families: Relationships in Contexts

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Référence bibliographique [3334]

Ambert, Anne-Marie et Krull, Catherine. 2006. Changing Families: Relationships in Context. Toronto: Pearson.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The interdisciplinary nature of this book makes it suitable for courses on the sociology of families, family studies, and psychology of families. Students reading this text will be exposed to variety of theoretical perspectives, and comprehensive picture of the diversity of modern family life. [...] Broad themes such as inequalities, gender roles, and the functional community, with a focus on social policies, link the content together in a integrative framework.» (quatrième de couverture)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Although Changing families: Relationships in Context includes all of the relevant information traditionally found in family textbooks, it also contains several chapters and many sections that are entirely innovative and even ’outside the box’ in the family textbook market. [...] I have introduced a wide range of theoretical frameworks. In addition to the better-known theories, such as structural functionalism and symbolic interactionism, others, including social constructionism, are much in evidence. [...] Therefore, although the results and theories from several other fields of inquiry are presented, they are placed within the analytical framework of sociology; a sociological perspective informs the text. [...] It is equally important to point out that most chapters in Changing Families: Relationships in Context focus on the nuclear family, broadly defined, rather than on the couple. This text is centred on the intergenerational axis rather than on adult ’intimate’ relationships in general.» (pp. xx-xxi) The sections named Families in New France, First Nations Families under French and British Rule and Québécois Families might particularly interest researchers in Quebec.