Profile of a Metropolitan North American Immigrant Suicidal Adolescent Population

Profile of a Metropolitan North American Immigrant Suicidal Adolescent Population

Profile of a Metropolitan North American Immigrant Suicidal Adolescent Population

Profile of a Metropolitan North American Immigrant Suicidal Adolescent Populations

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Référence bibliographique [3112]

Greenfield, Brian, Rousseau, Cécile, Slatkoff, Joshua, Lewkowski, Maxime, Davis, Michael, Dubé, Sébastien, Lashley, Myrna E., Morin, Isabelle, Dray, Patti et Harnden, Bonnie. 2006. «Profile of a Metropolitan North American Immigrant Suicidal Adolescent Population ». Revue canadienne de psychiatrie / Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 51, no 3, p. 155-159.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Canadian immigrant adolescents have a lower suicide rate than their nonimmigrant peers. We conducted a hypothesis-generating analysis to determine whether this lower rate correlated with level of drug use and (or) with diagnostic and demographic characteristics of Canadian immigrant adolescents presenting to an emergency room for crisis assessment. » (p. 155)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Known risks factors for suicide were compared among immigrant youth, North American youth, and a culturally mixed group of youth at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. » (p. 155)

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien;
- Questionnaire sociodémographique;
- Index of Family relations;
- Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children;
- Children’s Global Assessment Scale;
- The Spectrum of Suicidal Behavior Scale;
- Abbreviated Diagnostic Interview of Borderlines.

Types de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This article reports on the results of a secondary data analysis obtained from a study of suicidal adolescents who presented to the ER [emergency room] of a Canadian metropolitan pediatric hospital. […] The only between-group difference observed in this study was the lower rate of reported drug consumption by the Immigrant group at the time of crisis. Since the literature links drug and alcohol use with suicide risk (5,22), it is possible that this correlation could partly account for the decreased suicide rate among Canadian adolescent immigrants. This study also suggests that there are no other statistically significant diagnostic of family functioning differences between suicidal immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. » (p. 158)