Families’ Values and Attitudes Regarding Responsibility for the Frail Elderly: Implications for Aging Policy

Families’ Values and Attitudes Regarding Responsibility for the Frail Elderly: Implications for Aging Policy

Families’ Values and Attitudes Regarding Responsibility for the Frail Elderly: Implications for Aging Policy

Families’ Values and Attitudes Regarding Responsibility for the Frail Elderly: Implications for Aging Policys

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Référence bibliographique [3107]

Guberman, Nancy, Lavoie, Jean-Pierre, Fournier, Michel, Grenier, Lise, Gagnon, Éric, Belleau, Hélène et Vézina, Aline. 2006. «Families’ Values and Attitudes Regarding Responsibility for the Frail Elderly: Implications for Aging Policy ». Journal of Aging and Social Policy, vol. 18, no 3-4, p. 59-78.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This study’s aim is to examine the distribution and the effects of the norms and values associated with care to disabled and frail aging relatives. We particularly examined those norms and values regarding the sharing of responsibilities for care within three age cohorts, in order to inform social policy. » (p. 62)

2. Méthode

:

Échantillon/Matériau :
« In all, 1 315 people participated in a15-minutes, on average telephone interview. » (p. 62)
Criterions:
- Being part of the three cohorts identified
- Ability to understand French or English

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Our study offers little empirical evidence that the first choice of most frail elderly is to depend on family for hands-on caregiving, nor that most family members would freely and willingly choose to do so. On the contrary, it points to increased openness to delegating responsibilities to formal services. It would seem that values of individual autonomy and independence from others structure current family solidarities in Quebec. Respondents indicate that they are willing to provide support to frail elderly family members or friends but that this support circumscribed, has its limits, and takes place within particular family contexts. This is in marked opposition to the foundation of most aging and home care policy. » (p. 74)