Child Poverty and the Canadian Welfare State: from Entitlement to Charity

Child Poverty and the Canadian Welfare State: from Entitlement to Charity

Child Poverty and the Canadian Welfare State: from Entitlement to Charity

Child Poverty and the Canadian Welfare State: from Entitlement to Charitys

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Référence bibliographique [3083]

Ismael, Shereen T. 2006. Child Poverty and the Canadian Welfare State: from Entitlement to Charity. 1st ed. Aldershot (Angleterre) et Edmonton (Alberta): Ashgate et University of Alberta Press.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The book [...]represents an effort to understand the changes in social policy that normalize the existence of child poverty in a rich society like Canada. » (quatrième de couverture)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Child hunger and homelessness - once considered either sorrowful reflections of an economically impoverished society or shameful reflections of a morally impoverished state - have become commonplace. The increasing scope of child poverty in Canada has been high on the national agenda since at least 1989 when Ed Broadbent, leader of the New Democratic Party, proposed a resolution in the House of Commons to eliminate child poverty by 2000. The resolution passed unanimously and sparked the formation of Campaign 2000, a broad national coalition of non-governmental agencies committed to monitor the government’s progress toward that goal. More than a decade later, the September 2001 issue of Maclean’s remarked: ’Here we are in 2001...and child poverty in Canada is worse, not better.’ »(quatrième de couverture) Thus, the author tries to understand why despite the 2000 resolution against child poverty, we haven’t improved the situation yet. He also compares the different provincial social programs, such as Income Security, Health Benefits, Social Housing and Child Care.