Student Aid Time-Bomb: The Coming Crisis in Canada’s Financial Aid System

Student Aid Time-Bomb: The Coming Crisis in Canada’s Financial Aid System

Student Aid Time-Bomb: The Coming Crisis in Canada’s Financial Aid System

Student Aid Time-Bomb: The Coming Crisis in Canada’s Financial Aid Systems

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Référence bibliographique [3066]

Junor, Sean et Usher, Alexander. 2006. Student Aid Time-Bomb: The Coming Crisis in Canada’s Financial Aid System. Toronto: Educational Policy Institute.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper describes a looming crisis in Canadian student financial assistance.» (p. 5)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Les auteurs utilisent des données documentaires diverses.

Type de traitement des données :
Essai

3. Résumé


This paper «[...] begins by summarizing the known evidence with respect to student financial assistance. [...] The paper then looks at four sets of threats which are currently converging on the student aid system [...]. First, there is the increasing disregard of financial need as a means to distribute aid. New tuition freezes and tax credits are costing governments billions of dollars annually [...] Second, there are the rising costs in the country’s student loan system. Rising loan interest costs and expanded eligibility criteria threaten to increase the underlying loan costs by approximately $450 million. Third, there is the planned death of the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation. [...] Fourth, while these very serious issues are endangering the health of aid programs designed to help low-income students, Ottawa seems prepared to engage in a round of discussions with provinces with a view to possibly withdrawing from the field of student assistance and handing responsibilities to the provinces. [...] The paper concludes that by 2010 there may be an $800 million hole in the country’s student financial aid system. This $800 million hole is a sort of ticking time bomb. [...] [T]o defuse it [...] governments must stop treating student aid as a cheap forum for buying middle-class votes and once again treat it as a way to help those without means access educational opportunity.» (p. 5) Note that there are many references to the province of Quebec and also the students’ family.