Do Friendships and Sibling Relationships Provide Protection against Peer Victimization in a Similar Way?

Do Friendships and Sibling Relationships Provide Protection against Peer Victimization in a Similar Way?

Do Friendships and Sibling Relationships Provide Protection against Peer Victimization in a Similar Way?

Do Friendships and Sibling Relationships Provide Protection against Peer Victimization in a Similar Way? s

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Référence bibliographique [3047]

Lamarche, Véronique, Brendgen, Mara, Boivin, Michel, Vitaro, Frank, Pérusse, Daniel et Dionne, Ginette. 2006. «Do Friendships and Sibling Relationships Provide Protection against Peer Victimization in a Similar Way? ». Social Development, vol. 15, no 3, p. 373-393.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[...] [T]he goals of the present study were to investigate (a) whether reciprocal friends’ prosocial behavior moderates the relation between a child’s reactive aggression and peer victimization, and (b) whether a sibling’s prosocial behavior moderates the relation between a child’s reactive aggression and peer victimization.» (p. 376)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«It was hypothesized that the link between a child’s reactive aggression and victimization would be weak at a high level of friends’ prosocial behavior whereas this relation
should be strong at a low level of friends’ prosocial behavior. Similarly, it was expected that the relation of a child’s reactive aggression to victimization would be weak at a high level of sibling’s prosocial behavior whereas this association should be strong at a low level of sibling’s prosocial behavior.» (p. 376)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
246 six-year-old twin pairs (246 boys and 246 girls)

Instruments :
Preschool Social Behavioral Questionnaire (PSBQ)
2 items from the victimization subscale of the modified Peer Nomination Inventory
6 items developed by Dodge and Coie (1987)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Based on the notion that friendship may serve an important protective function against peer victimization, this study examined the moderating effect of reciprocal friends’ prosociality on the link between a child’s reactive aggression and victimization. The study also investigated whether a similar moderating effect could be found with respect to sibling’s prosociality, given that sibling relationships have been found to provide social benefits comparable to friendships. [...] The results showed that a child’s own reactive aggression uniquely contributed to the risk of victimization for both boys and girls. The link between reactive aggression and victimization was, however, moderated by reciprocal friends’ prosocial behavior and siblings’ prosocial behavior, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of their theoretical and prevention-related implications for children at risk for peer victimization.» (p. 373)