Intergenerational Transfer: The Impact of Parental Separation on Young Adult’s Conjugal Behaviour

Intergenerational Transfer: The Impact of Parental Separation on Young Adult’s Conjugal Behaviour

Intergenerational Transfer: The Impact of Parental Separation on Young Adult’s Conjugal Behaviour

Intergenerational Transfer: The Impact of Parental Separation on Young Adult’s Conjugal Behaviours

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Référence bibliographique [2917]

Provencher, Claudine, Le Bourdais, Céline et Marcil-Gratton, Nicole. 2006. «Intergenerational Transfer: The Impact of Parental Separation on Young Adult’s Conjugal Behaviour». Dans Canada’s Changing Families: Implications for Individuals and Society , sous la dir. de Kevin McQuillan et Ravanera, Zenaida R., p. 179-209. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In the analysis [presented in this chapter] we are interested in the formation and dissolution of the first union, and more specifically, in identifying the impact of parental separation on the behaviours of the children in early adulthood, after controlling for all the other factors that are likely to affect these behaviours. We will also briefly describe how these other factors influence the dynamics of formation and dissolution of the first union.» (p. 183)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Our analysis is based on data from the 1995 General Social Survey (GSS) on the family, a survey conducted on a sample of 10 749 individuals age 15 years and older and residing in Canada. […] Since we are interested in the impact of parental separation on the lives of young adults, we only considered respondents born between 1951 and 1980, that is, the generations who had been affected in relatively large numbers by the separation of their parents. […] For our study of union dissolution, we only selected respondents who had entered into a first union and who were between 25 and 44 years of age at the time of the survey. We excluded from our analysis individuals aged between 15 and 24 at the time of the survey, who had barely had the time to be exposed to the risk of a breakup, with the exception of those who had formed a union at a very young age. The sample used to study union dissolution, thus, consisted of 1 766 men who had formed a first union, through either marriage (939 men) or cohabitation (827 men), and 2 192 women (1 228 marriages and 964 cohabitations).» (p. 183-184)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Family life has undergone profound transformations over the past thirty years. The rise of conjugal instability has resulted in a growing number of children who are likely to experience parental separation through the course of their life. Do children who grew up in an environment marked by disruption in their parents’ conjugal lives, in turn, start their own conjugal lives differently from children who did not experience such family instability? This chapter explores this question [… Our] data allow us to measure the impact of dissolution of the parental union on the conjugal lives of the generations of children who became young adults between the 1970s and the mid-1990s. These young adults were born to parents who experienced union dissolutions in growing numbers, especially after the adoption of Canada’s divorce law in 1968 and the subsequent modifications to the law in 1986. Their experience of family life was strongly marked by the major transformations in conjugal life that occurred during the twentieth century, and we can hyppothesize that this affected the way in which these young adults started their own conjugal lives.» (p. 179)
«Our results confirm the existence of a link between disruption during childhood and adolescence in an individual’s family life and the individual’s behaviours associated with the first conjugal experience in early adulthood. Young adults who were affected as children by the separation of their parents tend to begin their own conjugal lives earlier on than individuals who grew up with both of their parents, and to do so through cohabitation. The effect of parental separation is exerted both directly and indirectly, through the adoption of particular attitudes and behaviours that, in turn, influence the formation of the union. As [other research] suggest, the separation of their parents may lead individuals to seek affection outside of the home by forming intimate relationships, which increase their chances of an early start to conjugal life and parenthood.» (p. 201)
«In sum, individuals who experience family disruption show a greater risk of adopting behaviours that are different from those of individuals who grow up with both of their parents, especially behaviours associated with the beginning of conjugal life. In that respect, the breakdown of the family is likely to have wide-reaching effects on the life course of individuals and on the fabric of society as a whole.» (p. 203)