Academic Achievement in First Nations Adolescents: The Role of Parental and Peer Attachment in Promoting Successful Outcomes

Academic Achievement in First Nations Adolescents: The Role of Parental and Peer Attachment in Promoting Successful Outcomes

Academic Achievement in First Nations Adolescents: The Role of Parental and Peer Attachment in Promoting Successful Outcomes

Academic Achievement in First Nations Adolescents: The Role of Parental and Peer Attachment in Promoting Successful Outcomess

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Référence bibliographique [277]

D’Arrisso, Alexandra. 2011. «Academic Achievement in First Nations Adolescents: The Role of Parental and Peer Attachment in Promoting Successful Outcomes». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Facutlé d’éducation.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study is an examination of the association between attachment relationships and academic achievement in First Nations adolescents.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
76 élèves de la 6e année au secondaire 5 d’une école d’une communauté du Nord-du-Québec

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Early parent-child interactions and attachment organization are essential to later psychosocial wellbeing (Vivona, 2000; Waters et al., 2000 ; Water et al., 2002), but as children develop into adolescents, attachment needs transform and peers also become important attachment figures (Shumaker et al., 2009). The quality of both parent-adolescent and peer-adolescent relationships are associated with social-emotional adjustment as well as academic outcomes (Duchesne & Larose, 2007; NadaRaja et al., 1992). In the present study, attachment theory was used as a guide to investigate the effects of quality of interpersonal relationships on academic achievement First Nations adolescents. Given the lack of research on attachment in First Nations populations, the conceptualization of attachment discussed in this study is borrowed from predominately Western literature with the knowledge that attachment may have a different meaning for First Nations communities in which family structure and parenting practices often differ from Western populations (Neckoway et al., 2007). The findings from this study, based on correlational analyses, indicate that First Nations students exhibit some similar patterns to other populations of adolescents in their attachments to parents and peers. The primary finding of this study was that attachment to father, but not to mother or peers, predicted academic success, as indicated by final grades at the end of the school year.» (p. 24-25)