Adolescent Parental Attachment and Academic Motivation and Performance in Early Adolescence

Adolescent Parental Attachment and Academic Motivation and Performance in Early Adolescence

Adolescent Parental Attachment and Academic Motivation and Performance in Early Adolescence

Adolescent Parental Attachment and Academic Motivation and Performance in Early Adolescences

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Référence bibliographique [2617]

Duchesne, Stéphane et Larose, Simon. 2007. «Adolescent Parental Attachment and Academic Motivation and Performance in Early Adolescence ». Journal of Applied Social Psychology, vol. 37, no 7, p. 1501-1521.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of the present study is to determine whether attachment quality with both parents is associated with adolescents’ academic motivation and performance during the first year in high school (i.e., Grade 7) and to test the role of problem behaviors (i.e., low internalized and externalized problems) and perceived teacher support as potential mediators of those links.» (p. 1502)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The hypothesis [...] is that associations between attachment and [...] academic outcomes will be mediated by adolescents’ problem behaviors in class and their perceptions of support from teachers, independent of democracy and subject matter difficulty.» (p. 1505)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
121 early adolescents

Instruments :
Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In this study, the links between adolescents’ attachment to parents and academic motivation and performance were examined while considering problem behaviors and perceived teacher support as potential mediators of those links. [...] Adolescents’ attachment to both parents was positively associated with academic motivation. These significant links were mediated by adolescents’ perceptions of support from teachers. Results are discussed in light of the different mechanisms that can relate attachment quality to adolescents’ academic motivation and performance.» (p. 1501) Some implications are drawn from these findings for intervention: «[...] it is important to provide parents with the tools that will enable them to be a source of support for their children: a base that will allow children to learn ways in which to regulate their own emotions.» (p. 1516)