Perceived Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis over a One-Year Period

Perceived Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis over a One-Year Period

Perceived Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis over a One-Year Period

Perceived Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis over a One-Year Periods

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Référence bibliographique [2601]

Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie, De Civita, Mirella, Dobkin, Patricia L., Malleson, Peter N., Meshefedjian, Garbis et Duffy, Ciaran M. 2007. «Perceived Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis over a One-Year Period ». Arthritis & Rheumatism (Arthritis Care & Research), vol. 57, no 2, p. 226-233.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« To document perceived adherence to treatment (taking medications and performing exercises) in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) over a 1-year period and to identify related factors. » (p. 226)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« We surveyed parents of patients with JIA at the Montreal Children’s Hospital and British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital in Vancouver. » (p. 226)

Instruments :
« Parents of children with JIA completed the following questionnaires repeatedly over a period of 12 months: 1) study questionnaire package that included the Parent Adherence Report Questionnaire (PARQ [28]; addressing questions about adherence to treatment), a demographics questionnaire, a questionnaire on the use of complementary and alternative medicine, and a question that addressed problems encountered with the health care system (completed at 3-month intervals); 2) the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (29), which evaluated caregivers’ psychological status (completed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months); 3) the Coping Health Inventory for Parents (CHIP) (30,31), which documented caregivers’ coping with their child’s illness (completed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months); and 4) the Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) (32), which described the child’s functioning/disability (completed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months). Clinicians (physicians, physical therapists, and occupational therapists) also completed a form at each clinical visit indicating prescribed treatment and opinions regarding patient adherence. Clinical information, obtained from the patient’s chart at each clinic visit, included type of JIA, active joint count, date of diagnosis, and prescribed treatments. » (p. 227)

Types de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The mean age of our sample of 175 children was 10.2 years; mean age at diagnosis was 6.1 years and mean disease duration was 4.1 years. Perceived adherence to medications was consistently high, with average adherence at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months being 86.1, 91.7, 90.4, 92.0, and 88.8, respectively, on the PARQ VAS. Perceived adherence to exercise was lower but remained steady, with corresponding means of 54.5, 64.1, 61.2, 63.0, and 54.3, respectively. Using generalized estimating equation analysis, factors associated with higher perceived adherence to medications included perceived helpfulness of medications and lower disease severity; those associated with higher perceived adherence to exercise were younger age of the child, child involvement in responsibility for treatment, and higher perceived helpfulness of the treatment. […] Belief in helpfulness of treatment is associated with higher parental perceived adherence to treatment. » (p. 226)