Being Arab: Ethnic and Religious Identity Building among Second Generation Youth in Montreal

Being Arab: Ethnic and Religious Identity Building among Second Generation Youth in Montreal

Being Arab: Ethnic and Religious Identity Building among Second Generation Youth in Montreal

Being Arab: Ethnic and Religious Identity Building among Second Generation Youth in Montreals

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Référence bibliographique [2599]

Eid, Paul. 2007. Being Arab: Ethnic and Religious Identity Building among Second Generation Youth in Montreal. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In the case of second-generation Arab Canadians it is interesting to examine whether their ethnic self-concepts are sustained through ethnically based socialization processes, thus contributing to their incorporation into a shared ethnic culture, and integrated ethnic community. » (p. ix-x)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The target population for this study consists of Muslim and Christian students of Arab origin [250] from 5 selected cegeps in Greater Montreal. The students, whose parents had both migrated from an Arab country, were between seventeen and twenty-four years of age. The selected institutions were Cegep Saint-Laurent, Collège de Bois-de-Boulogne, Collège Ahuntsic, Collège Montmorency, and Vanier College. » (p. 42)

Instruments :
- Questionnaire
- Guide d’entretien non directif (entrevues en profondeur menées auprès de 16 personnes)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique et analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Paul Eid focuses on the experiences of students from five colleges in Montreal to explore how Muslim and Christian Arab-Canadian youth actually negotiate their ethnic and religious identities. Paying close attention to the views of second generation Arab-Canadians about prejudice and discrimination in Canadian Society, Eid finds that while the Arab youth generally feel accepted, they also downplay their Arab background to ward off anticipated prejudice. He analyses the extent to which social and cultural practises are structured along ethnic and religious lines and also considers the influence of parental socialization, gender-related traditionalism, and perceived discrimination and stereotyping on Arab-Candian youth. » (quatrième de couverture) The section parental commitment to ethnic identity transmission « [...] examines how respondents perceive, and relate to, strategies, attitudes, and behaviours (conscious or unconscious) aimed at ethnocultural identity transmission. » (p. 93)