Sign Up!: Development of an ASL Board Game for Hearing Families with Deaf Children

Sign Up!: Development of an ASL Board Game for Hearing Families with Deaf Children

Sign Up!: Development of an ASL Board Game for Hearing Families with Deaf Children

Sign Up!: Development of an ASL Board Game for Hearing Families with Deaf Childrens

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Référence bibliographique [2516]

Ilkbasaran, Deniz. 2007. «Sign Up!: Development of an ASL Board Game for Hearing Families with Deaf Children». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département des sciences de l’éducation.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The purpose of this thesis project was to explore how an iterative participatory game design for deaf children and their hearing parents might contribute to elaborated interfamilial communication. » (p. iii)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« The main 3 research questions were (1) How can we design an iterative participatory design process that involves deaf children and their hearing parents, to produce a bilingual board game that reinforces elaborated conversations in ASL [American Sign Language]? (2) What kind of social interactions would emerge from such a play/design process? (3) What can this design process and the end-product game offer? » (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Dans le cadre de ce projet, trois adultes sourds ont été rencontrés ainsi que deux familles composées de parents entendants et d’au moins un enfant sourd.

Instruments :
- Questions pour le groupe de discussion
- Guide d’entretien semi-structuré pour les rencontres avec les parents
- Prototype du jeu
- Caméra-vidéo

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


« This thesis demonstrates that the initial outcomes of the iterative participatory design process have been promising in terms of providing an engaging and accessible tool to reinforce elaborated interfamilial communication during playtime. » (p. iii) Indeed, « [g]ames like Sign Up! have the potential to provide limited opportunities for favourable interactions within the family, and hopefully to lead to the retention and transfer of beneficial knowledge and skills outside the game. » (p. 80)