Parents’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of the Transition to School Experiences of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Parents’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of the Transition to School Experiences of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Parents’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of the Transition to School Experiences of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Parents’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of the Transition to School Experiences of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorderss

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Référence bibliographique [246]

Fontil, Laura. 2011. «Parents’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of the Transition to School Experiences of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montreal, Université Concordia, Département des sciences de l’éducation.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]his study aims to examine the transition experiences of children with ASDs [Autism Spectrum Disorders] and their families (both Canadian born and immigrant) as they make the transition from preschool to elementary school.» (p. 21)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The following questions guide this inquiry: What elements are involved in children with ASDs making the transition to kindergarten? How do parents and teachers perceive and experience this transition? How do Canadian families’ and immigrant families’ experiences with transition compare? What transition practices lead to successful transition to school, defined by parents perspectives of success?» (p. 22)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Ten children aged between 4 and 7 that were diagnosed with ASD and their parents and educators/teachers.

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif
- Questionnaire
- Grille d’observation

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Results revealed that caring, collaborative, and respectful partnerships [between school and parents] lead to successful transitions, while several barriers such as divergent belief systems, administration issues, lack of teacher knowledge, and language issues impeded smooth transitions to school. Canadian and immigrant family experiences were similar; however, immigrant families struggled with language issues more frequently and reportedly had less knowledge of the pathways of communication between resources compared to Canadian families. The transition process from preschool to elementary school for children with ASDs from diverse backgrounds has important implications for school policies and interagency collaboration.» (p. iii-iv)