Less Access, Worse Quality: New Evidence about Poor Children and Regulated Child Care in Canada

Less Access, Worse Quality: New Evidence about Poor Children and Regulated Child Care in Canada

Less Access, Worse Quality: New Evidence about Poor Children and Regulated Child Care in Canada

Less Access, Worse Quality: New Evidence about Poor Children and Regulated Child Care in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [2330]

Prentice, Susan. 2007. «Less Access, Worse Quality: New Evidence about Poor Children and Regulated Child Care in Canada ». Journal of Children & Poverty, vol. 13, no 1, p. 57-73.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The author tries to understand why, in « [...] Canada, poor children have less access to child care than do more affluent children and are overrepresented in lower-quality care arrangements as revealed through close reviews of Quebec, Vancouver, and Winnipeg. » (p. 57)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


« The care and education needs of Canada’s children are widely acknowledged to require urgent action. A series of high-profile reports and champions have worked to focus political attention on quality child care. Whether framed as the ‘real way to reverse the brain drain’ or as ‘high-yield public investments’, the net message is that a universally accessible system of developmental and inclusive child care services would be beneficial for all children, and particularly good for poor children (Coffey 2003; McCain and Mustard 1999; Rolnick and Grunewald 2003). Nationally, few of Canada’s children are enrolled in licensed child care facilities; within this, the access of poor children is even worse. Child poverty is persistent and widespread in Canada. [...] Despite national political commitments to the reduction or elimination of child poverty and to the development of an early childhood care and education system for all children, low-income children in Canada have less access to quality child care. The pattern holds all across Canada, manifesting on the west coast, the prairies and even in the much admired province of Quebec. The explanation lies in Canada’s policy architecture, which delivers child care primarily through a privatized co-production with the voluntary sector. » (pp. 57-58)