Informal Networks Social Capital of Fathers: What Does the Social Engagement Survey Tell Us?

Informal Networks Social Capital of Fathers: What Does the Social Engagement Survey Tell Us?

Informal Networks Social Capital of Fathers: What Does the Social Engagement Survey Tell Us?

Informal Networks Social Capital of Fathers: What Does the Social Engagement Survey Tell Us?s

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [2302]

Ravanera, Zenaida R. 2007. «Informal Networks Social Capital of Fathers: What Does the Social Engagement Survey Tell Us? ». Social Indicators Research, vol. 83, no 2, p. 351–373.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper examines social capital derived from informal networks and its variation among men categorized as: (1) men with no children, and (2) men living with children in (a) intact, (b) step, and (c) lone parent families. The focus on men stems from a concern that their role in families has not been as extensively studied as that of women. » (p. 351)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« General Social Survey on Social Engagement conducted by Statistics Canada in 2003. » (p. 351)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The results show that married men living with children have higher social capital – measured in terms of the number of friends, relatives, and neighbors, and in their level of trust in them – than lone fathers or step fathers in cohabiting unions. Compared to child-free men, married fathers have higher social capital but also tend to have friends who are more similar to themselves in age, education, or income. » (p. 351)
« Social capital has often been invoked for the differences in children’s well-being by family structure; that is, developmental outcome for children in lone parent or step family is not at par with that of children from intact family because parental investments on children may be lower not only in financial and human capital but also in social capital. This analysis partly provides support for this contention as lone fathers and cohabiting stepfathers do seem to have lower social capital derived from informal networks. That married step-fathers and cohabiting fathers living with their biological children have social capital not much different from married fathers indicate the need for more research on other forms of social capital, in particular, the social capital within families themselves. While one indicator (trust in one’s family) is included in this analysis, the network examined in this study refers more to extended family, relatives, friends, and neighbors, mainly because the survey data do not allow for more extensive analysis of social capital within families. It could be that social capital brought about by relationships within the family, say, between father and child or between partners may have greater impact than the informal network social capital examined here. » (p. 366)