Parental Conflicts and Their Damaging Effects on Children

Parental Conflicts and Their Damaging Effects on Children

Parental Conflicts and Their Damaging Effects on Children

Parental Conflicts and Their Damaging Effects on Childrens

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Référence bibliographique [2271]

Sarrazin, Janie et Cyr, Francine. 2007. «Parental Conflicts and Their Damaging Effects on Children ». Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, vol. 47, no 1-2, p. 77-93.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
Cet article se veut une revue de la littérature sur les conflits parentaux et leurs impacts sur les enfants.

Questions/Hypothèses :
« [W]hy [is it] that not all children from families with high levels of parental conflict develop difficulties? And why not all types of parental conflicts affect children negatively? » (p. 88)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Recension des écrits

3. Résumé


« It is clear that children can easily become victims of parental conflicts. Without having a choice, they have to deal with the consequences of their parents’ fighting. [...] Some children show a surprising level of resilience. [...] In fact, even if some children do not demonstrate restrictive psychopathologies, it does not mean that they are not subtly feeling psychological distress when facing their parents’ divorce. [...] The concept of resilience in the context of parental divorce is thus very complex and requires more research. We are still lacking a great deal of knowledge about how many children who are able to resist much of the stress surrounding parental divorces are also able to protect themselves from parental conflicts. We also need to try to recognize better the children who become deeply affected by parental conflicts and how they are different from children who are able to resist this stress. One way to look at this question could be to compare several children’s reactions while isolating some variables such as the age of the children, the quality of their relationship with each of their parents or the available resources in their environment. » (p. 88)