Unpacking the Childcare and Education Policy Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from the Canadian Province of Quebec

Unpacking the Childcare and Education Policy Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from the Canadian Province of Quebec

Unpacking the Childcare and Education Policy Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from the Canadian Province of Quebec

Unpacking the Childcare and Education Policy Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from the Canadian Province of Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [22612]

Mathieu, Sophie. 2021. «Unpacking the Childcare and Education Policy Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from the Canadian Province of Quebec ». Journal of Childhood Studies, vol. 46, no 3, p. 63-78.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This article aims «to offer insights on what can be learned from Quebec’s childcare [and education] policy response to the COVID-19 pandemic.» (p. 64)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


This article reveals four goals that influence the Province of Quebec’s decisions to reopen childcare centers and schools in 2020. «The first objective, protecting public health, is the closest to the population approach, and it is the only objective that was not an explicit part of Quebec’s family policy prior to the pandemic. At the other end of the spectrum is the fourth objective of helping parents reconcile paid and family responsibilities. Following this goal, younger children, who are more likely to struggle with independent online learning, will be given priority access to in-person schooling, not only because older children and young adults can more easily pursue online education with minimal supervision, but also because younger children require more supervision and need to be cared for while their parents work. The objective of helping parents balance earning and caring responsibilities […] is a key component of Quebec’s family policy, though the second and third objectives, promoting academic success/fostering early education and addressing social inequalities are also in tune with the “social investment” paradigm, and the official government discourse in Quebec.» (p. 67) However, «[b]y focusing on the instrumentality of childcare to help parents combine earning and caring responsibility, the mobilization of childcare in Quebec […] has never really sidestepped the issue of gender equality and mothers’ role as breadwinners.» (p. 75)