Moving Forward Together, Stronger, and Closer: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Marital Benefits in Infertile Couples

Moving Forward Together, Stronger, and Closer: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Marital Benefits in Infertile Couples

Moving Forward Together, Stronger, and Closer: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Marital Benefits in Infertile Couples

Moving Forward Together, Stronger, and Closer: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Marital Benefits in Infertile Coupless

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Référence bibliographique [22440]

Sauvé, Marie-Soleil, Péloquin, Katherine et Brassard, Audrey. 2020. «Moving Forward Together, Stronger, and Closer: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Marital Benefits in Infertile Couples ». Journal of Health Psychology, vol. 25, no 10-11, p. 1532-1542.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study first sought to provide a more detailed portrait of the marital benefits derived during the course of fertility treatment in order to expand knowledge of their nature and meaning for each couple. The study also sought to describe each partner’s individual point of view within a dyadic perspective that considers the impact of each person’s reality on the other.» (p. 1533)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants initially took part in a larger quantitative study on well-being in mixed-sex couples undergoing fertility treatment, recruited in fertility clinics or through social media. Inclusion criteria for this larger study were [p]rimary infertility, [c]urrently being involved in fertility treatment, and [p]articipation from both partners.» (p. 1534) L’échantillon est composé de 3 couples.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


The study identified five types of marital benefits: «[b]eing engaged in a shared hardship, [f]eeling closer to one another, [f]eeling reassured in the relationship, [d]eveloping satisfying communication and support behaviors, and [h]aving faith in the couple’s capacity to face adversity. Hence, researchers and clinicians who are interested in marital benefits should now consider assessing these five particular types of relationship gains, beyond simply asking whether infertility strengthened the relationship. Results from this study could also inform the development of a more comprehensive measure to assess marital benefits. In contrast to past quantitative and qualitative studies, [the] results also show that marital benefits can be found in those currently undergoing treatment or those having just decided to end treatment and not only in couples who have long-ended treatment […]. Overall, [the] results agree with a review by Ying and Loke (2016) that reported a greater sense of “partnership” among those who shared the adversity and hardship of infertility. As with [the] participants [of the present study] infertility is often seen as a threat to relationships, while surviving the ordeal together often contributes to relational security […]. Most importantly, the dyadic analysis offered an initial look at the relational dynamics that possibly contributed to the occurrence of marital benefits. This aspect clearly sets this study apart from previous qualitative and quantitative studies.» (p. 1537-1538)