Language Abilities of Children with Refugee Backgrounds: Insights from Case Studies

Language Abilities of Children with Refugee Backgrounds: Insights from Case Studies

Language Abilities of Children with Refugee Backgrounds: Insights from Case Studies

Language Abilities of Children with Refugee Backgrounds: Insights from Case Studiess

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [22313]

MacLeod, Andrea A. N., Meziane, Rabia Sabah et Pesco, Diane. 2020. «Language Abilities of Children with Refugee Backgrounds: Insights from Case Studies ». Applied Psycholinguistics, vol. 41, no 6, p. 1329-1349.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The aims of this study was «to develop profiles of [refugee] children’s language learning and language abilities by examining the familial and school contexts for language learning, the children’s language development, and their current language exposure and abilities.» (p. 1333)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Three boys from refugee backgrounds participated in the study […]. The boys’ families came to Canada through the Canadian government-sponsored program within the previous 12 months of participating in the present study. They ranged in age from 5.10 to 6.6 and were attending welcome classes at the kindergarten or grade 1 level. These classes, offered to children in Québec who begin school with no or very limited knowledge of French, are intended to support French learning and integration to the school setting through small class sizes and teachers with training in second language learning […].» (p. 1334) The children profiles were developed «by triangulating data from parent interviews, teacher reports, standardized language measures, and direct observations of the children as they interacted with adults and peers.» (p. 1344)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Authors «were able to develop rich profiles of the strengths and weaknesses of the children in this understudied population […]. Through these profiles, [they] documented what protracted language development might look like for these children.» (p. 1347) «Within the family context, [they] observed changes in the family responsibilities related to the migration, and challenges learning the language of the broader community. The parents of the three boys were well educated; however, the families were facing economic hardships following their immigration due to difficulties in finding work. In the postmigration context, economic hardship has been observed in other communities of refugees […]. In addition to the recent changes in family contexts, families were experiencing challenges related specifically to language following their arrival in Montréal. Parents reported difficulties learning the new language […]. This limited proficiency in French created a barrier between the families and school. The parents noted that it was hard to be involved in their child’s education because they had to sort through information coming from the school in the form of written memos, and they didn’t understand what their child was learning at school. The impact of the language barrier on parental involvement in schooling has also been reported by parents from other communities […].» (p. 1344)