The Differential Association of Socioeconomic Vulnerabilities and Neglect-Related Child Protection Involvement Across Geographies: Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

The Differential Association of Socioeconomic Vulnerabilities and Neglect-Related Child Protection Involvement Across Geographies: Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

The Differential Association of Socioeconomic Vulnerabilities and Neglect-Related Child Protection Involvement Across Geographies: Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

The Differential Association of Socioeconomic Vulnerabilities and Neglect-Related Child Protection Involvement Across Geographies: Multilevel Structural Equation Modelings

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Référence bibliographique [22062]

Esposito, Tonino, Chabot, Martin, Caldwell, Johanna, Webb, Calum, Delaye, Ashleigh, Fluke, John D., Trocmé, Nico et Bywaters, Paul. 2022. «The Differential Association of Socioeconomic Vulnerabilities and Neglect-Related Child Protection Involvement Across Geographies: Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling ». Children & Youth Services Review, vol. 138, p. 1-10.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study aims to add to a wide body of methodological approaches to measure factors relevant to health and social service […], and in so doing to contribute findings on poorly understood and under-acknowledged structural neighborhood factors associated with neglect.» (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
In this study, the authors «examined administrative child protection data across 10,650 small area geographies using full six digit postal codes within Quebec’s 166 community health and social service regions, which are used to delineate public health and social service delivery areas across the province in local community health centers (Centre locale de services communautaires; CLSC).» (p. 3)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results of this study illustrate highly localized intersections of poverty- and neglect-related child protection intervention that vary by child population density. [The] results confirm past findings that a variety of social and economic factors increase risk of child protection involvement for reasons of neglect (Dubowitz, Pitts, & Black, 2004; Garbarino & Collins, 1999; Korbin et al., 2000; Lacharité, 2014). This is not surprising given “neglect” can entail a wide range of social and economic gaps around families (e.g., Garbarino & Collins, 1999). However, [the] finding that child population density may modify this relationship is, to [the authors’] knowledge, novel. Following previous findings that external factors can influence child protection decision making (Fluke et al., 2014; Graham et al., 2015; Stoddart et al., 2018), [the] finding that lower density areas may exacerbate the risk of poverty-driven neglect suggests that more precise understanding of the geographic factors around families is needed.» (p. 5)