Pre- and Postnatal Maternal Smoking and Offspring Smoking Trajectories: Evidence from a 20-Year Birth Cohort

Pre- and Postnatal Maternal Smoking and Offspring Smoking Trajectories: Evidence from a 20-Year Birth Cohort

Pre- and Postnatal Maternal Smoking and Offspring Smoking Trajectories: Evidence from a 20-Year Birth Cohort

Pre- and Postnatal Maternal Smoking and Offspring Smoking Trajectories: Evidence from a 20-Year Birth Cohorts

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Référence bibliographique [21734]

Chadi, Nicholas, Ahun, Marylin N., Laporte, Catherine, Boivin, Michel, Tremblay, Richard E., Côté, Sylvana M. et Orri, Massimiliano. 2021. «Pre- and Postnatal Maternal Smoking and Offspring Smoking Trajectories: Evidence from a 20-Year Birth Cohort ». Preventive Medicine, vol. 147, p. 1-7.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of this research was to investigate the associations between different trajectories of maternal smoking during the pre- and postnatal periods and smoking trajectories during the offspring’s adolescence (12–19 years).» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The authors «used data from the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, a longitudinal birth cohort conducted by the Institut de la Statistique du Québec […] which followed children born in the Canadian province of Québec in 1997 or 1998. […] For this study, [they] used data from 1661 participants for whom [they] had data on self-reported smoking at ages 12, 13, 15, 17, or 19 years of age (at least one data point).» (p. 2)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The results of the study «suggest that exposure to maternal smoking either prenatally or during childhood increases the risk of early onset (i.e., before age 15) smoking in youth […]. Only a persistent exposure to maternal smoking (i.e., during pregnancy and during childhood) increased the risk of both early and late-onset smoking (i.e., after age 15).» (p. 4) The authors «found that children exposed to maternal smoking either before or after birth were more likely to smoke during adolescence compared to children that were never exposed.» (p. 5) The study also «showed that only persistent maternal smoking was associated with late onset adolescent smoking. This may in fact indicate that factors other than maternal smoking (such as peer use), become more important in predicting smoking as adolescents age […].» (p. 6) Overall, this «study shows that exposure to maternal smoking in the pre- and/or postnatal periods increases the risk of early onset smoking in the offspring.» (p. 6)