The Socializing Role of Logical Consequences, Mild Punishments and Reasoning in Rule-Breaking Contexts Involving Multifaceted Issues

The Socializing Role of Logical Consequences, Mild Punishments and Reasoning in Rule-Breaking Contexts Involving Multifaceted Issues

The Socializing Role of Logical Consequences, Mild Punishments and Reasoning in Rule-Breaking Contexts Involving Multifaceted Issues

The Socializing Role of Logical Consequences, Mild Punishments and Reasoning in Rule-Breaking Contexts Involving Multifaceted Issuess

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [21729]

Robichaud, Jean‐Michel et Mageau, Geneviève A. 2019. «The Socializing Role of Logical Consequences, Mild Punishments and Reasoning in Rule-Breaking Contexts Involving Multifaceted Issues ». Social Development, vol. 29, no 1, p. 356-372.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of [this] study was to extend past work on the socializing role of logical consequences to rule‐breaking contexts involving multifaceted issues.» (p. 366)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«A total of 214 high school adolescents, aged between 14 and 18 years old [102 girls], participated in this study. Participants were part of a larger research on parenting and, as such, they also took part in Robichaud, Mageau et al. (2019)’s study, although different manipulations and variables were examined.» (p. 360)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In sum, authority exertion in persistent rule‐breaking contexts is a socialization tool that requires precautious use. Previous research had established the relevance of exerting logical consequences in response to transgressions clearly established as non‐personal issues, but had yet to assess the role of this strategy in settings involving multifaceted issues. The present study addressed this gap and showed that, even if parents feel that they have the legitimacy to exert their authority in these situations, they need to adjust their interventions to their adolescents’ transgression perceptions in order to optimally foster socialization. Adolescents categorizing the multifaceted transgression as non‐personal rated the logical consequence as more preferable to alternative authority exertion strategies. However, adolescents focusing on the personal facets of the same transgression rated all forms of constraint as suboptimal, leaving reasoning as the preferred intervention. These results are important because they offer concrete (although preliminary) recommendations on how and when to exert authority to promote adolescents’ development.» (p. 370-371)