Parenting Behaviors and the Prevention of Psychopathology in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder

Parenting Behaviors and the Prevention of Psychopathology in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder

Parenting Behaviors and the Prevention of Psychopathology in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder

Parenting Behaviors and the Prevention of Psychopathology in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorders

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Référence bibliographique [21716]

Iacono, Vanessa. 2019. «Parenting Behaviors and the Prevention of Psychopathology in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de psychologie.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The current dissertation was designed to both examine and intervene in the relations between exposure to distinct aspects of the caregiving environment in middle childhood and psychopathology in the OBD [offspring of parents with bipolar disorder]. In the first study, concurrent and longitudinal data were used to investigate if levels of support (emotional warmth), structure (organization and consistency), and control (disciplinary strategies) provided by parents in middle childhood mediated the relation between having a parent with bipolar disorder and offspring mental health. […] In the second study, the efficacy of a 12-week program, entitled Reducing Unwanted Stress in the Home (RUSH), was examined […].» (p. iii)

Questions/Hypothèses :
Author «hypothesized that parents with BD would display non-optimal parenting in all domains relative to control parents. Moreover, we expected that having a parent with BD [bipolar disorder] would increase offspring’s likelihood of experiencing emotional and behavioral problems by way of increased disruptions in parenting practices during middle childhood.» (p. 24) Moreover, it was «postulated that the presence of low structure would yield the strongest predictive relations with symptoms of psychopathology among the OBD relative to the ONAD [offspring of parents with no affective disorder].» (p. 25)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
For the first article, «[p]arents with a diagnosis of BD were recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics in the province of Québec, as well as from advocacy and support groups.» (p. 25) «Assessments were made at two time points […]. The initial sample was recruited between 1996 and 1998, and included 145 (76 female) offspring between the ages of 4 and 13 years […] from 103 families […]. One hundred and one (52 female) offspring between the ages of 15 and 21 years […] from 74 families […] returned for assessment at least ten years later, consisting of 70% of the original sample.» (p. 26) For the second article, «[f]amilies with a parent having BD (n=25) were recruited to participate in a prevention intervention using online and newspaper advertisements, as well as through local clinics and patient support and advocacy groups within the region of Montréal, Quebec.» (p. 53)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Results from the first article, «showed that parenting practices in middle childhood mediated the associations between having a parent with or without BD, and internalizing and externalizing symptoms in offspring in middle childhood and approximately 12 years later. As expected, parents with BD displayed significant impairments in parenting practices relative to control parents, providing less support, structure, and control to their offspring in middle childhood. […]. During middle childhood, parental structure, to a greater extent than support or control, underlay the relation between parents’ diagnosis of BD and a range of internalizing and externalizing difficulties in their offspring. Specifically, parents with BD were more likely than their psychologically healthy counterparts to provide low levels of organization, consistency, and stability in the home during middle childhood that, in turn, predicted higher rates of psychopathology in the OBD.» (p. 31-32) Otherwise, «[t]hree main findings emerged [from the second article]. First, levels of dyadic mutuality were significantly different between the OBD and ONAD preintervention, with OBD dyads showing lower levels of dyadic mutuality than controls at T1. […] Second, participating in the RUSH program resulted in reduced parental negativity and enhanced parental positivity and dyadic mutuality among the OBD dyads immediately post-intervention (T2). […] Third, although intervention induced changes in parent-child interaction quality did not alter overall levels of internalizing and externalizing symptoms in the OBD, significant effects were observed for specific types of internalizing problems.» (p. 64-65)