Exposure to Trauma in Intimate Partner Violence Human Service Work: A Scoping Review

Exposure to Trauma in Intimate Partner Violence Human Service Work: A Scoping Review

Exposure to Trauma in Intimate Partner Violence Human Service Work: A Scoping Review

Exposure to Trauma in Intimate Partner Violence Human Service Work: A Scoping Reviews

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Référence bibliographique [21683]

Brend, Denise, Krane, Julia et Saunders, Sara. 2019. «Exposure to Trauma in Intimate Partner Violence Human Service Work: A Scoping Review ». Traumatology, vol. 26, no 1, p. 127-136.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This scoping review explores the impact of the exposure of HSPs [Human service professionals] to trauma through IPV [intimate partner violence] work.» (p. 134)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The following databases were searched in the spring of 2017 with no temporal limitations: PsycINFO, PILOTS, Cinahl, Medline, Social sciences full text, Socindex, Social work abstracts, and Gender studies databases.» (p. 128) «The results of this search were 13 studies published internationally between 2000 and 2015 […].» (p. 129)

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«Five distinct descriptive themes were identified: challenges to physical, psychological, and emotional well-being; enriched personal growth and enjoyment; new ways of seeing power in relationships and behaviors related to gender; stress, traumatization, and self-care; and workplace social support.» (p. 129) «The findings of this scoping review are consistent with evidence showing that HSPs can suffer as a result of exposure to the aversive details of traumatic events […]. Although the HSPs exposed to IPV sampled across these studies are heterogeneous, the findings are consistent with a body of research describing the uniquely challenging nature of practice in the context of violence that occurs in intimate relationships or that is sexual in nature. […] The findings of this review also reflect previous research showing how human service work that is potentially distressing can also be valued and appreciated by HSPs. [The authors also mention that] HSPs who do not feel they can expose their suffering may not be able to access the support and treatment that traumatization demands. As such, professionals with high stress levels may continue to engage in IPV practice, while potentially suffering the impacts. […] Both the suffering of HSPs and the potential for them to underperform in their roles, helping vulnerable and volatile clientele, present a clear and pressing need to mitigate the potentially harmful impacts of exposure to this risk.» (p. 133)