Maternal Childhood Abuse and Neglect Predicts Offspring Development in Early Childhood: The Roles of Reflective Functioning and Child Sex

Maternal Childhood Abuse and Neglect Predicts Offspring Development in Early Childhood: The Roles of Reflective Functioning and Child Sex

Maternal Childhood Abuse and Neglect Predicts Offspring Development in Early Childhood: The Roles of Reflective Functioning and Child Sex

Maternal Childhood Abuse and Neglect Predicts Offspring Development in Early Childhood: The Roles of Reflective Functioning and Child Sexs

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Référence bibliographique [21676]

Garon-Bissonnette, Julia, Duguay, Gabrielle, Lemieux, Roxanne, Dubois-Comtois, Karine et Berthelot, Nicolas. 2021. «Maternal Childhood Abuse and Neglect Predicts Offspring Development in Early Childhood: The Roles of Reflective Functioning and Child Sex ». Child Abuse and Neglect, p. 1-11.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The main objective of the study was to evaluate the role of impairments in RF [reflective functioning] in the association between CA&N [childhood abuse and neglect] and child general development between 11 and 36 months, and whether this association was moderated by child sex.» (p. 6)

Questions/Hypothèses :
Authors predicted «that maternal CA&N would influence child development indirectly through the mothers’ RF, and that this effect would be particularly apparent in young boys.» (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Pregnant women were recruited between September 2015 and September 2018 during prenatal classes [in the province of Quebec]. Between 11 and 36 months postpartum, eligible mothers were invited to participate in the longitudinal follow-up. […] The present study thus comprised 111 women aged between 17 and 41 years old at T1 […], the vast majority being primiparous (87.8 %).» (p. 3)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Overall, results confirmed the theoretical model: CA&N prospectively predicted child general development and this association was indirectly mediated by mothers’ impairments in RF. Different pathways were observed in boys and girls who clustered developmental problems. [The] study builds on the scarce literature concerning the adverse effects of maternal CA&N on child general development […] and offers additional evidence that offspring of mothers having been exposed to CA&N are more likely to present poor developmental outcomes than offspring of mothers without CA&N. In contrast with Racine et al. (2018), [authors] did not observe significant effects of maternal psychological symptoms on child development using established questionnaires of depressive, post-traumatic stress, and dissociative symptoms. [They] reported, however, that low levels of certainty and high levels of uncertainty about mental states […] in pregnant women were predictive of their child’s development one to three years later. Interestingly, [the] results suggest that higher certainty about mental states is associated with lower levels of post-traumatic, depressive and dissociative symptoms as well as better child global development. […] Although this is the first study […] to document such an association between maternal certainty and uncertainty about mental states and child global development, results expand previous findings showing that mothers’ RF contributes to offspring’s self-regulation […], secure attachment […], and temperament […].» (p. 6-7)