A Comparison of Parent and Teacher Ratings of Child Behaviours: the Pygmalion Effect Revisited

A Comparison of Parent and Teacher Ratings of Child Behaviours: the Pygmalion Effect Revisited

A Comparison of Parent and Teacher Ratings of Child Behaviours: the Pygmalion Effect Revisited

A Comparison of Parent and Teacher Ratings of Child Behaviours: the Pygmalion Effect Revisiteds

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Référence bibliographique [2152]

Bigras, Marc, Gosselin, Catherine, Capuano, France, Normandeau, Sylvie et Parent, Sophie. 2008. A Comparison of Parent and Teacher Ratings of Child Behaviours: the Pygmalion Effect Revisited. Montréal: Université du Québec à Montréal.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The objective of the present study was to compare early academic achievement of children that caretakers disagree/agree about their early social competencies or behavioural problem observed in preschool. » (p. 5)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« We posited that school achievement is highly contrasted when teachers and parents agreed, namely highly positive when there were a consensus about child’s social competency and, conversely, highly negative when the child is evaluated with behavioural difficulties by both raters. Although, we do not have specific hypothesis for children for whom their caretakers disagree about their behaviours, we intend to focus on variable such as parenting stress and expectation in order to understand possible bias that might affect child’s school achievement. » (p. 5)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon comprend 384 enfants et leurs familles.

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Early schooling experience is a reliable predictor of later school and professional adjustment. In the context of important investment made in the preschool curriculum to promote early academic achievement among children at risk of failure, the validity of screening and referring procedures is a rising issue. [...] Results of the present study confirmed the value of screening protocol based on consensus between parents and teacher for greater attention to children needs. However, further results suggested that kindergarten’ teachers might be considered as a unique and valid informant to predict early academic achievement. » (p. 1)