Feasibility and Ethical Issues: Experiences and Concerns of Healthcare Workers Regarding a New RSV Prophylaxis Programme in Nunavik, Quebec

Feasibility and Ethical Issues: Experiences and Concerns of Healthcare Workers Regarding a New RSV Prophylaxis Programme in Nunavik, Quebec

Feasibility and Ethical Issues: Experiences and Concerns of Healthcare Workers Regarding a New RSV Prophylaxis Programme in Nunavik, Quebec

Feasibility and Ethical Issues: Experiences and Concerns of Healthcare Workers Regarding a New RSV Prophylaxis Programme in Nunavik, Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [21428]

Lorcy, Armelle, Gilca, Rodica, Dubé, Eve, Rochette, Marie et De Serres, Gaston. 2020. «Feasibility and Ethical Issues: Experiences and Concerns of Healthcare Workers Regarding a New RSV Prophylaxis Programme in Nunavik, Quebec ». International Journal of Circumpolar Health, vol. 79, no 1.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This qualitative study describes the experience and opinions of HCWs [healthcare workers] at the end of the first RSV [respiratory syncytial virus] season after the implementation of the new programme.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 20 travailleurs (principalement non-autochtones) du domaine de la santé. Les participants ont été recrutés dans quatre villages du Nunavik.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The implementation of the new RSV prophylaxis (palivizumab) programme in Nunavik was confronted with feasibility and acceptability issues.» (p. 7) «According to HCWs in close contact with the population, some parents did not make an informed and free decision.» (p. 5) «[A] nurse explained that in general Inuit parents do not like leaflets much. Information not systematically given in Inuktitut and not completely adapted to the Inuit could have caused misunderstanding among the parents or caregivers. Some interviewed participants felt that parents or caregivers signed the consent with confusion and distrust and some of them did not understand why they had to come back with their infant for additional injections. More specifically, there were concerns regarding the freedom of parents to refuse PVZ [palivizumab] for their babies. According to the respondents, [some] feared being judged as bad parents if they refused PVZ for their child. Some parents apparently accepted because they were afraid that the DYP [Director of Youth Protection] would pressure them and get them in trouble. According to the nurses and midwives, the fear of DYP intervention was one of the main reasons why few parents refused PVZ. Feeling under pressure, parents did not make a free decision.» (p. 6) «Finally, this study underscores the complexity of implementing health programmes, particularly in the field of Indigenous health.» (p. 7)