Thoughts of Self-Harm and Associated Risk Factors Among Postpartum Women in Canada

Thoughts of Self-Harm and Associated Risk Factors Among Postpartum Women in Canada

Thoughts of Self-Harm and Associated Risk Factors Among Postpartum Women in Canada

Thoughts of Self-Harm and Associated Risk Factors Among Postpartum Women in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [21424]

Palladino, Elia, Varin, Mélanie, Lary, Tanya et Baker, Mélissa M. 2020. «Thoughts of Self-Harm and Associated Risk Factors Among Postpartum Women in Canada ». Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 270, p. 69-74.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The «objectives of this study are [to]estimate the prevalence of thoughts of self-harm among postpartum women in Canada [and] explore prevalence by socio-demographic characteristics, [and] examine the associations between thoughts of self-harm and maternal mental health status (self-rated mental health, symptoms of postpartum depression, and generalized anxiety disorder).» (p. 70)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 6 558 Canadiennes. Environ 22% des participantes proviennent du Québec. Les données sont issues de l’étude Survey on Maternal Health (SMH) de Statistiques Canada.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


In this «study, 10.4% of postpartum women reported having thoughts of self-harm since the birth of their child. [Also, 37,0%] of women with thoughts of self-harm during the postpartum period [reported] low mental health. [Furthermore, this] study highlights an important relationship between postpartum depression/generalized anxiety disorder and thoughts of self-harm. [The authors] found that over half of women who reported they had thoughts of self-harm also had moderate levels of symptoms of postpartum depression and over one-third of women with thoughts of self-harm also experienced symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. [This] study highlights important associations between thoughts of self-harm and prenatal and postpartum factors. Findings from the adjusted regression analyses show an association between thoughts of self-harm and women in the province of Quebec, moderate levels of symptoms of PPD and generalized anxiety disorder, and low mental health. Women in Quebec were less likely than women in Ontario to report thoughts of self-harm during the postpartum period. This is interesting in light of a study which found that Quebec had the highest prevalence of higher mental health and was the only Canadian province to be associated with higher mental health […].» (p. 72-73)