Near and Far, With Heart and Hands: Care Work in the Context of Refugee Settlement in Canada

Near and Far, With Heart and Hands: Care Work in the Context of Refugee Settlement in Canada

Near and Far, With Heart and Hands: Care Work in the Context of Refugee Settlement in Canada

Near and Far, With Heart and Hands: Care Work in the Context of Refugee Settlement in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [21376]

Larios, Lindsay. 2019. «Near and Far, With Heart and Hands: Care Work in the Context of Refugee Settlement in Canada ». International Journal of Care and Caring, vol. 3, no 2, p. 263-278.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of this analysis is to highlight the importance of care work and how it is shaped by and reproduces inequalities, and to offer counter-narratives to those that have emerged within immigration politics on the contributions of refugee women to Canadian society.» (p. 264)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Six participants were recruited through local community organisations in Montreal [...].» (p. 267) «Participants’ areas of origin included the Middle East, South East Asia and Latin America. Half of the participants arrived in Canada as government-assisted refugees while the other half had made their refugee claims at the border.» (p. 267)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«This research [provides] a glimpse into the lives of refugee women in Montreal, in particular, how their various caregiving roles are impacted by the circumstances of their immigrant status and settlement needs.» (p. 275) Results show «that relational identities and the way participants understand their caring actions in different care settings are characterised largely by protection, hope and empowerment (in the home), guilt and discontent (transnationally), or solidarity and empowerment (in the community). Furthermore, in each case, participants link their care work to broader issues of inequality shaped by immigrant status (also often characterised by race and class) and gender.» (p. 275) Results also show «how care work can be a potential benefit both for the individuals and community cared for, and also for the provider (Tronto, 1993).» (p. 276) However, «[p]articipants’ articulation of their transnational care work, in contrast to the other two sites, is entirely characterised by discontent, guilt and the clear identification of inequality.» (p. 276) In sum, Canadian immigrant policies «are justified or made politically palatable by constructions of refugees as non-contributing and a drain on society. Th[is] analysis […] aims to offer a counter-narrative and argues that measures such as these reproduce inequality within Canada and around the world.» (p. 276-277)