''It Made Me More Human'': Existential Journeys of Family Caregivers from Prognosis Notification Until after the Death of a Loved One

''It Made Me More Human'': Existential Journeys of Family Caregivers from Prognosis Notification Until after the Death of a Loved One

''It Made Me More Human'': Existential Journeys of Family Caregivers from Prognosis Notification Until after the Death of a Loved One

''It Made Me More Human'': Existential Journeys of Family Caregivers from Prognosis Notification Until after the Death of a Loved Ones

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Référence bibliographique [21363]

Vachon, Mélanie. 2020. «''It Made Me More Human'': Existential Journeys of Family Caregivers from Prognosis Notification Until after the Death of a Loved One ». Journal of Palliative Medicine.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study seeks to acquire an in-depth understanding of the existential journey of family caregivers from prognosis notification until after death.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were recruited on a specialized PC [palliative care] ward in a University Health Center in Montreal, Canada. […] All participants (n=22) were separately interviewed by the main researcher (n=16) or by a trained psychology doctoral candidate (n=6).» (p. 2)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


The analysis of existential journeys of family caregivers «can be described in terms of three dynamic dimensions: from avoidance to integration of death, from meaninglessness to meaningfulness, and from transformation to transmission. The 22 women in our study seemed to be at different points in their existential journeys. However, this journey should not be interpreted as a linear process, but as a dynamic oscillation between meaning and senselessness, and between the avoidance and confrontation of death. Indeed, the existential journeys of our participants led them to a sense of personal transformation, and a few of them hoped to share their journeys and to help others. [R]esults support the small body of research on this topic, as prior research indicates that in confronting death, caregivers can become more aware of life’s fragility, confront their own mortality, and seek meaning. Our findings also support many existential theories which argue that overwhelming experiences, such as the death of a loved one, awaken one’s existential consciousness. […] Although many participants reported having little time and space for introspection during their caregiving experience, they eventually felt a desire to share their stories to help make sense of their experiences, to help others, or to transform themselves.» (p. 5)