Needs-Focused Interventions for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Cancer: A Descriptive Interpretive Study

Needs-Focused Interventions for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Cancer: A Descriptive Interpretive Study

Needs-Focused Interventions for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Cancer: A Descriptive Interpretive Study

Needs-Focused Interventions for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Cancer: A Descriptive Interpretive Studys

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Référence bibliographique [21361]

Marcotte, Jade, Tremblay, Dominique, Turcotte, Annie et Michaud, Cécile. 2019. «Needs-Focused Interventions for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Cancer: A Descriptive Interpretive Study ». Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 27, p. 2771-2781.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The study objectives are twofold: [to] understand caregivers’ needs in caring for OACs [older adults with cancer] and [to] identify their suggestions for interventions that might address these needs.» (p. 2772)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 15 conjoints ainsi que de 10 enfants adultes (12 femmes et 3 hommes). La région de provenance des participants n’est pas mentionnée, mais l’étude a été conduite par une équipe de Sherbrooke (Estrie).

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien de groupe

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«This study provides us with a better understanding of the needs of caregivers (adult children and spouses) in caring for OACs and the potential supportive interventions that they believe might help them meet these needs. Participants verbalized a need to receive information, some of which had to be communicated at different moments along the cancer trajectory, while other details had to be communicated during the OACs’ hospitalization. […] Caregivers also expressed a desire for clear information, including receiving explanations of medical terms and getting information in an appropriate context.» (p. 2777) Moreover, caregivers «clarified a need to be in a “good” relationship with people they judged important during the cancer trajectory. HCPs [health care providers], relatives, and OACs can provide assistance to ease caregivers’ task burden, as well as psychological support for caregivers. […] Interestingly, caregivers acknowledged the need to care for themselves as important but admitted considering the OACs’ needs first. [Participants] viewed their role as a safeguard, advocate, listener, and assistant for the OAC at home and during treatment, and had the goal of ensuring a more positive experience throughout the cancer trajectory.» (p. 2778)