Association Between Peer Victimization and Parasomnias in Children: Searching for Relational Moderators

Association Between Peer Victimization and Parasomnias in Children: Searching for Relational Moderators

Association Between Peer Victimization and Parasomnias in Children: Searching for Relational Moderators

Association Between Peer Victimization and Parasomnias in Children: Searching for Relational Moderatorss

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Référence bibliographique [21237]

Bilodeau, François, Brendgen, Mara, Vitaro, Frank, Côté, Sylvana M., Tremblay, Richard E., Petit, Dominique, Montplaisir, Jacques et Boivin, Michel. 2020. «Association Between Peer Victimization and Parasomnias in Children: Searching for Relational Moderators ». Child Psychiatry & Human Development, vol. 51, p. 268-280.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The main objectives of this study were to examine […] the association between peer victimization and parasomnias in elementary school aged children and […] whether this association is moderated by the level of support from three key figures in the child’s life (i.e., mothers, teachers, and friends).» (p. 270)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were part of the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD). The QLSCD consists of families that had a child born in the Canadian province of Quebec […] between October 1997 and July 1998. […] The present study is based on participants for whom the main variables (i.e., peer-victimization and parasomnias) were available at age 8, which resulted in a sample of 1150 children (52.4% girls, 47.6% boys)[.]» (p. 270-271)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


In light of their research, the authors address the association between peer victimization and parasomnias in various ways such as support from mothers, teachers and friends. Concerning the family aspect, the «[f]indings revealed that the predictive effect of peer victimization on parasomnias was no longer significant for girls when mothers showed warm and supportive behaviors. Although [the authors] did not find a direct (i.e., main) effect of supportive maternal parenting on parasomnias, this mitigating effect is nevertheless consistent with other research showing that parents’ warm behaviors are associated with healthier sleep patterns in children. [The] results also add to previous evidence showing that warm parenting can mitigate, at least for girls, the negative effect of peer victimization on other aspects of children’s developmental adjustment, such as internalizing and externalizing problems. The mitigating effect of maternal warmth and support might be explained in part by mothers’ capacity to patiently deal with their children’s disturbed sleep patterns without becoming stressed themselves, thus helping to calm their children’s worries. Moreover, many recommendations for parents to address sleep problems in children resemble positive parenting strategies. For example, the use of parental reassurance, the maintenance of a positive attitude and emotional support, are among the recommendations to be used with children who have parasomnias.» (p. 276)