The Gap Between Coverage and Care-What Can Canadian Paediatricians Do about Access to Health Services for Refugee Claimant Children?

The Gap Between Coverage and Care-What Can Canadian Paediatricians Do about Access to Health Services for Refugee Claimant Children?

The Gap Between Coverage and Care-What Can Canadian Paediatricians Do about Access to Health Services for Refugee Claimant Children?

The Gap Between Coverage and Care-What Can Canadian Paediatricians Do about Access to Health Services for Refugee Claimant Children?s

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Référence bibliographique [21161]

Rink, Nikky, Muttalib, Fiona, Morantz, Gillian, Chase, Liana, Cleveland, Janet, Rousseau, Cécile et Li, Patricia. 2017. «The Gap Between Coverage and Care-What Can Canadian Paediatricians Do about Access to Health Services for Refugee Claimant Children? ». Paediatrics & Child Health, vol. 22, no 8, p. 430-437.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This study searches «to describe the experiences of refugee claimant children who were denied health services after June 2012, identify barriers to health care access and understand their impact.» (p. 431)

Questions/Hypothèses :
The authors «anticipated that despite the Quebec government extending health care coverage, refugee claimant families faced difficulties in accessing care.» (p. 431)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The sample is constituted of 11 parents (9 mothers, 2 fathers). They were recruited «from the Multicultural Clinic at the Montreal Children’s Hospital, a hospital-based clinic for children new to Canada, and two community-based clinics from within the CSSS [Centre de Services de Santé et des Services Sociaux] de la Montagne (including the regional resettlement agency) that provide care to a large population of child and adult refugee claimants in the greater Montreal area.» (p. 431)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«All refugee claimant children in this study should have been eligible for health care services. Despite this, our results show that difficulties in accessing care persisted in Montreal. The barriers we identified mainly related to administrative hurdles and lack of provider and refugee claimant knowledge regarding the IFHP [Interim Federal Health Program].» (p. 435) For example, «[f]amilies reported being unaware of their document expiry and difficulty accessing and understanding online instructions for renewal. […] Participants reported that some administrators and/or physicians were misinformed or unsure about IFHP coverage. They also seemed unaware of the provincial coverage available to refugee claimants during the period of IFHP cuts. Some were told that only urgent problems or those posing a public health risk were covered. […] All interviewees were at some point refused services for their children or asked to pay for clinic consultations, hospital visits, medications or investigations. Many parents describe the inability to pay the fees (n=7). As a result, they were not seen by the physician (n=4) or did not purchase prescribed medication (n=3). […] Most of the participants received no or very sparse information from Citizenship and Immigration Canada about their health care rights and how to access health services.» (p. 432)