Conceptions and Experiences of Paternal Involvement Among Quebec Fathers: A Dual Parental Experience

Conceptions and Experiences of Paternal Involvement Among Quebec Fathers: A Dual Parental Experience

Conceptions and Experiences of Paternal Involvement Among Quebec Fathers: A Dual Parental Experience

Conceptions and Experiences of Paternal Involvement Among Quebec Fathers: A Dual Parental Experiences

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Référence bibliographique [21126]

Gervais, Christine, de Montigny, Francine, Lavoie, Kevin, Garneau, Julie et Dubeau, Diane. 2020. «Conceptions and Experiences of Paternal Involvement Among Quebec Fathers: A Dual Parental Experience ». Journal of Family Issues, p. 1-21.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of this study is to fill this gap by looking at fathers’ conceptions and experiences of their engagement, and the more specific issues they encounter within the family, and more particularly with their child. To this end, it is designed as a study of one case, that of Quebec, a province in Canada where the social role of father is in transition.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 26 pères québécois d’enfants de moins de cinq ans. La région de provenance de ces hommes n’est pas mentionnée dans l’article, mais la recherche a été principalement conduite par une équipe de l’Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO). La collecte de données s’est faite à partir d’entrevues de groupe.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


This study shows that «fathers attached great importance to their presence with their children […]. [The participants] endorsed the culture of paternal involvement, which implies greater gender equity in the care provided to children. [They] embraced the changing social relationships and norms of the contemporary family […], as well as a supportive role with respect to their spouse and child […]. This emphasis on supporting the child’s mother illustrates how couples “co-construct” the paternal role on a daily basis […]. [They also] reported a significant transformation in their lives since the birth of their child, as well as some challenges in the construction and integration of their paternal identity. [In] fact, father’s experience of developing and maintaining engagement with their child revealed a certain complexity in aligning their expectations of themselves, their aspirations, and the social messages they received in relation to their paternal role. [They] had few models around them to inspire and model this role of engaged father, which they often constructed in opposition to the traditional model of father, perceived as authoritarian, often absent, and having little closeness with his children.» (p. 13-14) Overall, the results «highlight the contradictory messages to which they are exposed in relation to their role with their families […].» (p. 15)