Sexual Orientation and the ’Cohabitation Gap’ in Life Satisfaction in Canada

Sexual Orientation and the ’Cohabitation Gap’ in Life Satisfaction in Canada

Sexual Orientation and the ’Cohabitation Gap’ in Life Satisfaction in Canada

Sexual Orientation and the ’Cohabitation Gap’ in Life Satisfaction in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [21113]

Dilmaghani, Maryam. 2019. «Sexual Orientation and the ’Cohabitation Gap’ in Life Satisfaction in Canada ». Review of Economics of the Household, vol. 17, p. 1163-1189.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This paper examines how sexual orientation associates with ‘cohabitation gap’ in life satisfaction in Canada. Some results concerning the province of Quebec are discussed.

Questions/Hypothèses :
Author «hypothesized that the cohabitation gap is smaller for homosexuals, especially for lesbians when they are compared with heterosexual women.» (p. 1168)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«To examine the cohabitation gap by sexual orientation, this paper pools 6 consecutive cycles of the Canadian GSS [General Social Surveys], covering 2010 to 2015. The oldest cycle employed in this study has been conducted in 2010, five years after the legal recognition of same-sex marriage across Canada. The latest cycle has been conducted in 2015.» (p. 1168)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The results show that «there is a robust cohabitation gap among heterosexuals in Canada, which is larger for women. Second, a cohabitation gap is also found for gay men, whose size is measurably larger than that observed among heterosexual men. But, no evidence emerged that being legally married positively predicts the life satisfaction of Canadian lesbians. […] Perhaps, the most notable result of this study is the finding that the cohabitation gap in life satisfaction is considerably larger among gay men than heterosexuals and lesbians.» (p. 1183) «Interestingly in Québec, no cohabitation gap was found for males, regardless of sexual orientation. But among Québec women, a cohabitation gap was found for both heterosexuals and homosexuals. Nonetheless, it must be noted that the number of homosexuals residing in Québec remained rather small (70 males and 65 females), undermining the usefulness of the inferences. […] For both gay men and lesbians, the presence of children predicted a higher likelihood of being married while residence in Québec predicted a lower likelihood of marriage. These findings resonate with the previous literature on the fertility effects of registered partnership regarding Swedish homosexuals […], and the high degree of substitution between marriage and cohabitation in Québec […].» (p. 1182)