Characteristics of Canadian Youth Reporting a Very Early Age of First Sexual Intercourse

Characteristics of Canadian Youth Reporting a Very Early Age of First Sexual Intercourse

Characteristics of Canadian Youth Reporting a Very Early Age of First Sexual Intercourse

Characteristics of Canadian Youth Reporting a Very Early Age of First Sexual Intercourses

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [2111]

Boyce, William F., Gallupe, Owen et Fergus, Stevenson. 2008. «Characteristics of Canadian Youth Reporting a Very Early Age of First Sexual Intercourse ». The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, vol. 17, no 3, p. 97-108.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The present study used a younger age (11 or less for males, 12 or less for females) to identify students who had very early FSI [first sexual intercourse] with a view to determining whether the associations found in prior studies that used a higher age for ’early’ FSI would be stronger, weaker or no different. »  (p. 99)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The data for this study comes from the Canadian Youth, Sexual Health and HIV / AIDS Study (Boyce et al., 2003), a classroom based survey designed to measure sexual health behaviours, attitudes, determinants, and knowledge of key sexual health issues in a nationwide sample of adolescents. Conducted in 2002 / 2003 (n=11,125), Grade 7, 9, and 11 students (approximately 12, 14 and 16 years) from all provinces and territories were included, with the exception of Nunavut. » (p. 99)

Instruments:
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The present study examined the correlates of having experienced first sexual intercourse (FSI) at a very early age using a large, national classroom sample of Canadian adolescents from the Canadian Youth, Sexual Health and HIV / AIDS Study (Boyce et al., 2003). Most of the available studies on this topic have divided adolescent respondents into categories of ’early’ and ’late’ based on the average age of first intercourse. As a result, a portion of the young people identified in these studies as having had ’early’ first sexual intercourse had actually done so at an age when intercourse would have been becoming normative. The large size of the present sample of adolescents (n=2301; mean age 15.8 years) provided enough males and females who had non-normative very early FSI to compare them with peers who had first intercourse later. Associations were tested on variables in four conceptual categories: family relationships; psychological factors; peers and risk-taking; and partner-related factors. A very early age of FSI (defined as 11 years of less for males and 12 years or less for females), was associated with having experienced pressure to have unwanted sex, having used drugs other than marijuana, and believing that popularity at school is dependent upon rebelling / breaking the rules. While the retrospective nature of our cross-sectional analysis precludes assigning directionality of influences, the possible predictive value of the findings, including the influence of ’fitting in’ with peers, is considered in relation to future research on this topic. » (p. 97)