The Governor, the Merchant, the Soldier, the Nun, and their Slaves: Household Formation and Kinship in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Montréal

The Governor, the Merchant, the Soldier, the Nun, and their Slaves: Household Formation and Kinship in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Montréal

The Governor, the Merchant, the Soldier, the Nun, and their Slaves: Household Formation and Kinship in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Montréal

The Governor, the Merchant, the Soldier, the Nun, and their Slaves: Household Formation and Kinship in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Montréals

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Référence bibliographique [21109]

Loucks, Alanna. 2019. «The Governor, the Merchant, the Soldier, the Nun, and their Slaves: Household Formation and Kinship in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Montréal». Mémoire de maîtrise, Kingston (Ontario), Université Queen’s, Département d’histoire.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of this research project is to illustrate how French households in Montréal between 1650 and 1750, which included Indigenous and African descent slaves and other labourers who are generally not considered as a part of family formation, contributes to our understanding of the interconnected nature of the French colonial world.» (p. ii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Le corpus de sources comprend entre autres différents plans et cartes de la ville de Montréal, des écrits de correspondances, des actes notariés, ainsi que des écrits religieux tel que les Relations des Jésuites.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


In the first part of the research, the author «argues for both the fragility of the French colonial presence in the Great Lakes region, and the influence of the region’s Indigenous inhabitants over the commercial and social alliances established with the French, and between the French and other Indigenous nations.» (p. 9) «The second half of the thesis then moves into a micro-analysis of family and household formation.» (p. 9) In this part, the author «argues for a need to extend the definition of the family beyond the nuclear form, to include kinship and commercial or social ties that frequently extended across large geographic distances.» (p. 10) «In Montréal, the extended family was the norm, which came to include individuals connected by blood ties, but also through commercial associations and kinship ties - whether real or fictive. Creating and maintaining these ties involved different strategies to promote commercial interactions, set up marriages, and enhance wealth or status across all levels of society and outside of the city’s walls. […] This thesis has insisted that slaves and ‘ordinary’ individuals be considered a part of family formation. When considered through a more inclusive perspective, a study of family formation and networks in Montréal allows for a more complete and complex view of colonial society.» (p. 120)