‘I’m Just Asking you to Keep an Ear Out’: Parents’ and Children’s Perspectives on Caregiving and Community Support in the Context of Migration to Canada

‘I’m Just Asking you to Keep an Ear Out’: Parents’ and Children’s Perspectives on Caregiving and Community Support in the Context of Migration to Canada

‘I’m Just Asking you to Keep an Ear Out’: Parents’ and Children’s Perspectives on Caregiving and Community Support in the Context of Migration to Canada

‘I’m Just Asking you to Keep an Ear Out’: Parents’ and Children’s Perspectives on Caregiving and Community Support in the Context of Migration to Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [21030]

Klassen, Christina L., Gonzalez, Emilia, Sullivan, Richard et Ruiz-Casares, Monica. 2020. «‘I’m Just Asking you to Keep an Ear Out’: Parents’ and Children’s Perspectives on Caregiving and Community Support in the Context of Migration to Canada ». Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, p. 1-19.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This research explores the views and experiences of both children and adults in regards to changes in caregiving roles among family members, including children, in the migration context as well as community factors that help or hinder the provision of adequate supervision. Ultimately, the study aims to contribute to unpacking misunderstandings between migrant families and CYP [child and youth protection] professionals in order to improve interventions to strengthen community relations in ethno-culturally diverse settings.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Forty-four recent and second-generation migrants from 16 Afro-Caribbean and Latin American countries participated in five focus group discussions (FGD). Three FGD were conducted involving 25 children aged 12–17 years old (two Afro-Caribbean FGD n = 6, 10; one Latin American FGD, n = 9) and two FGD were conducted with 19 adult caregivers of children (Afro-Caribbean, n = 10; Latin American, n = 9). According to recruitment criteria, caregivers were required to be the primary caregiver of at least one child aged less than 18 years (range = 1–5 children) and caregivers and children had to have lived in the province of Quebec for at least five years. […] Recruitment for the FGD was done in Montreal in collaboration with well-established community-based organisations serving different ethno-cultural communities.» (p. 4)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien de groupe

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Migrant families face specific challenges to child caregiving and supervision, in particular those related to changes in cultural norms and lack of supportive social networks and communities. Children frequently take on caregiving roles for both cultural and contextual reasons, which can be interpreted as inadequate supervision by neighbours and CYP professionals even in cases where parents deem children adequately responsible to care. Participants also highlighted the important role of social support in providing adequate care. The absence of support from neighbours in Montreal was characterised as a significant change from most participants’ communities of origin and one that affected their sense of safety in the community as well as their caregiving decisions. This study provides insights about what characteristics of neighbourhoods are (un)helpful in child supervision and suggests that understanding the role of host country prejudices toward migrant parents is key in the promotion of more supportive communities.» (p. 15)