Mental Health Help-Seeking Patterns and Perceived Barriers for Care Among Nulliparous Pregnant Women

Mental Health Help-Seeking Patterns and Perceived Barriers for Care Among Nulliparous Pregnant Women

Mental Health Help-Seeking Patterns and Perceived Barriers for Care Among Nulliparous Pregnant Women

Mental Health Help-Seeking Patterns and Perceived Barriers for Care Among Nulliparous Pregnant Womens

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Référence bibliographique [21015]

Da Costa, Deborah, Zelkowitz, Phyllis, Nguyen, Tuong-Vi et Deville-Stoetzel, Jean-Benoit. 2018. «Mental Health Help-Seeking Patterns and Perceived Barriers for Care Among Nulliparous Pregnant Women ». Archives of Womens Mental Health, vol. 21, p. 757-764.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objectives of this study were [to] estimate the proportion of nulliparous pregnant women who had discussed mental health issues with a healthcare provider in the past year; […] identify the type of providers more frequently consulted; […] examine the association between sociodemographics, couple adjustment and depressive symptoms with mental health consultation; and […] describe the barriers to mental help-seeking and associated factors among pregnant women reporting an unmet need for mental help-seeking in the past year.» (p. 758)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 1176 femmes enceintes recrutées dans la région de Montréal.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The authors «found that one in five women in their third trimester of pregnancy reported having spoken to a healthcare provider about their emotional symptoms in the past year. Among the subgroup of women reporting elevated depressive symptoms in the third trimester, 1 in 3 indicated having consulted with a health professional about their symptoms. Nearly 18% reported that in the past year, there was a time when they had wanted to consult with a healthcare provider about their emotional symptoms but had not sought or received care.» (p. 761) These findings «suggest that an important number of women experiencing depressive symptoms do not speak to a healthcare provider during the perinatal period […]. [Moreover, they found that family] doctors, psychologists and social workers/ counsellors were among the top three providers women reported consulting with about their emotional symptoms. [Likewise, maternal] age, specifically being in the 30–39 age group, emerged as an independent determinant of discussing emotional symptoms with a healthcare provider, and was marginally significant in the subgroup with depressive symptoms. [Finally, women] from racial/ethnic minorities experiencing depressive symptoms in their third trimester were less likely to have discussed their symptoms with a health provider compared to white women.» (p. 762)