Maternal Stress and Anxiety Disorders and the Longitudinal Risk of Fractures in Children

Maternal Stress and Anxiety Disorders and the Longitudinal Risk of Fractures in Children

Maternal Stress and Anxiety Disorders and the Longitudinal Risk of Fractures in Children

Maternal Stress and Anxiety Disorders and the Longitudinal Risk of Fractures in Childrens

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [20976]

Auger, Nathalie, Low, Nancy, Lee, Ga Eun, Ayoub, Aimina et Luu, Thuy Mai. 2020. «Maternal Stress and Anxiety Disorders and the Longitudinal Risk of Fractures in Children ». Bone, vol. 130.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The authors «examined the association between maternal stress and anxiety disorders before, during, or after pregnancy and childhood fractures by site, cause, and age.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The authors used data from «a longitudinal cohort study of 773,339 infants born in hospitals of Quebec, Canada between 2006 and 2016. In Quebec, the majority of births occur in hospital (99%), thus the cohort is population- based. […] The data were extracted from the Maintenance and Use of Data for the Study of Hospital Clientele registry, a compilation of all discharge summaries in Quebec.» (p. 2)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In this longitudinal study of 773,339 mother-child pairs, [the authors] found that a history of maternal stress and anxiety was associated with 1.2 times the risk of pediatric fractures, compared with no mental disorder. Associations were present for both maternal stress and anxiety, and were more prominent for fall and assault-related fractures. Associations with assault-related fractures were strongest between 0 and 5 months of age, whereas associations with fall-related fractures were more apparent at older ages, especially after 36 months. These findings suggest that maternal stress and anxiety disorders may be associated with risk of future childhood fractures. Identification and treatment of stress and anxiety disorders in women of reproductive age may provide opportunities to reduce the risk of childhood fractures in future offspring, especially fractures due to child maltreatment.» (p. 3)