Social Space and Family Reproduction Among Quebec City Leather Workers in 1911

Social Space and Family Reproduction Among Quebec City Leather Workers in 1911

Social Space and Family Reproduction Among Quebec City Leather Workers in 1911

Social Space and Family Reproduction Among Quebec City Leather Workers in 1911s

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Référence bibliographique [20903]

Harton, Marie-Eve, Richard, Laurent, Marcoux, Richard et St-Hilaire, Marc. 2019. «Social Space and Family Reproduction Among Quebec City Leather Workers in 1911 ». Annales de démographie historique, vol. 138, no 2, p. 55-82.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The article draws upon a three-fold analysis of social space and family reproduction among Quebec City leather workers.» (p. 58)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«This article sustains the idea that the diversity of reproductive patterns uncovered using the family-wage economy model suggests that kinship and social networks played an important role as well.» (p. 57)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The main sources were «the full-count household-level microdata from the 1911 census compiled and geocoded by the “Population et histoire sociale de la ville de Québec” (PHSvQ) project, [and] the “Integrated infrastructure of the Quebec population historical microdata” (IMPQ) project […].» (p. 60)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This detailed spatial analysis shows that reproductive behaviour varied across Quebec City in 1911. First of all, there was a marked difference between own-children estimates for the upper town, where effective fertility rates were lower, and those for the St. Charles valley, where fertility levels were higher. […] Second, [the] results suggest that the spatial distribution of leather workers’ households was partly associated with differences in reproductive strategies. The phenomenon is most noticeable among families where the wife was between the ages of 35 and 39. [The authors argue that] the absence of stopping behaviour was more prevalent than elsewhere in Quebec City. Third, kinship ties and kin propinquity influenced reproductive outcomes among leather workers. The presence of a maternal grandmother in the city, especially if she did not live with her daughter, had a significant positive effect on the number of young children in a household. […] However, the presence of a paternal grandmother did not have this positive effect on fertility outcomes. [Overall, the results of this] microdemographic study highlights complex interconnections between modes of production and reproduction strategies, uncovering distinct patterns of fertility behaviour in Quebec City during the industrial period.» (p. 74)