Understanding Early Childhood Education and Care Utilization in Canada: Implications for Demand and Oversight

Understanding Early Childhood Education and Care Utilization in Canada: Implications for Demand and Oversight

Understanding Early Childhood Education and Care Utilization in Canada: Implications for Demand and Oversight

Understanding Early Childhood Education and Care Utilization in Canada: Implications for Demand and Oversights

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Référence bibliographique [20895]

Varmuza, Petr, Perlman, Michal et White, Linda A. 2019. «Understanding Early Childhood Education and Care Utilization in Canada: Implications for Demand and Oversight ». International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy, vol. 13, no 7, p. 1-22.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he goals of this study were to examine: [the] ECEC [early childhood education and care] utilization in Canada with a particular interest in national use of unlicensed HCC [home child care]; [the] ECEC utilization in Canada from an equity perspective with the expectation that children from lower income, less educated families would be more likely to be cared for in unlicensed HCC; [the] regional differences in ECEC utilization in different regions across Canada; and finally [the] differences in government estimates, based on sector surveys, of the number of spaces in licensed HCC with the number of parents who report that their children are in such care in the GSS [General Social Survey].» (p. 6)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 1100 familles canadiennes ayant au moins un enfant qui ne va pas encore à l’école. Les données proviennent l’Enquête sociale générale de 2011.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The authors mention that «the data from Quebec where ECEC services are much more affordable, suggest that, when given the option, working families prefer accessing licensed ECEC services. Specifically, the GSS data from 2011 reveal that less than 13% of children in some form of regular childcare arrangement in Quebec were found in unlicensed care, as opposed to almost 46% in Ontario. This suggests that fee subsidies enabled parents to move away from using unlicensed care. More recent data are needed to examine whether changes in the tax system allowing families to claim reimbursement for cost of care in the unlicensed HCC sector […] will lead to increases in parent utilization of such services in Quebec. Furthermore, it is important to note that while compared to the rest of Canada, more children of working parents in Quebec are in some form of non-parental care on a regular basis, there is a segment of families in Quebec who choose to arrange their work schedules in ways that enable them to accommodate all of their childcare needs within the family unit.» (p. 17-18)