Inequalities in Access to Early Childhood Education and Care in Canada

Inequalities in Access to Early Childhood Education and Care in Canada

Inequalities in Access to Early Childhood Education and Care in Canada

Inequalities in Access to Early Childhood Education and Care in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [20894]

Japel, Christa et Friendly, Martha. 2018. Inequalities in Access to Early Childhood Education and Care in Canada. Coll. «The Equal Access Study». Munich (Allemagne): The International Center Early Childhood Education and Care, German Youth Institute.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper […] seeks to address questions about inequality in access to early childhood education and care through the prism of Canada.» (p. 4)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Les auteures utilisent des données secondaires provenant entre autres du recensement canadien de 2016 réalisé par Statistique Canada ainsi que de l’Étude longitudinale du développement des enfants du Québec (ELDEQ).

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This paper has three main sections. The first describes the context and provides an overview of ECEC [early childhood education and care] and related family policy issues for Canada as a whole. […] The second and third sections of the paper focus on Ontario and Quebec in more detail […].» (p. 5) Concerning the province of Quebec, the results show in particular that this province «has a unique status in the Canadian federation thanks to its progressive social and educational policies. It is the only province that has invested substantial amounts of public funds over the last 20 years in the creation of a universal child care system that offers parents affordable child care. Nonetheless, its child care system cannot be considered a universal programme as only close to two-thirds of children aged zero to four have access to regulated care. In view of the increased labour force participation of mothers with young children, this means an important number of families have to rely on unregulated care.» (p. 56) Also, «[e]xisting data reveals that inequality in access to ECEC is still a reality [in Quebec]. Vulnerable populations such as children from low-income or immigrant families are underrepresented in the child care sector.» (p. 57)