GSS 2011 Linked with TIFF: Exploring the Cost of Child Care in Canada and the Use of the Child Care Expense Deduction

GSS 2011 Linked with TIFF: Exploring the Cost of Child Care in Canada and the Use of the Child Care Expense Deduction

GSS 2011 Linked with TIFF: Exploring the Cost of Child Care in Canada and the Use of the Child Care Expense Deduction

GSS 2011 Linked with TIFF: Exploring the Cost of Child Care in Canada and the Use of the Child Care Expense Deductions

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Référence bibliographique [20893]

Findlay, Leanne et Kohen, Dafna. 2020. «GSS 2011 Linked with TIFF: Exploring the Cost of Child Care in Canada and the Use of the Child Care Expense Deduction ». Canadian Journal of Family and Youth, vol. 12, no 1, p. 81-103.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of the current study is to examine the feasibility of using linked survey and administrative data to compare and contrast parent-reported child care costs on the General Social Survey and information on parent’s child care claim from tax information via the child care expense deduction.» (p. 84)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Les auteures utilisent diverses données produites par Statistique Canada telles que l’Enquête sociale générale sur les familles de 2011 ainsi que les données de revenu pour les déclarants et leurs familles.

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Results show that «[i]n 2011, 54% of parents of children ages 0 to 11 reported that they had used child care for at least one child in the past year […]. As would be expected, some differences in child care participation were shown by province, with 67% (74%) of parents in Quebec reporting having used child care compared to 41% (50%) of parents in Manitoba […]. Those who were married or common law were less likely to use child care than those who were single or divorced/widowed. Higher education was associated with a greater likelihood of reporting having used child care. […]» (p. 87) Also, «analyses suggested that individuals who reported more than the maximum tax-eligible amount were less likely to live in Quebec, Manitoba or Saskatchewan (compared to Ontario), were more likely to have a higher household income, and were more likely to have a greater number of children in the household.» (p. 88) Moreover, «[a]s expected, parents in Quebec were the most likely to report having used child care, as were individuals who were married or common law, with a higher education, and higher income.» (p. 90-91)