(Re) Conceptualizing Neglect: Considering the Overrepresentation of Indigenous Children in Child Welfare Systems in Canada

(Re) Conceptualizing Neglect: Considering the Overrepresentation of Indigenous Children in Child Welfare Systems in Canada

(Re) Conceptualizing Neglect: Considering the Overrepresentation of Indigenous Children in Child Welfare Systems in Canada

(Re) Conceptualizing Neglect: Considering the Overrepresentation of Indigenous Children in Child Welfare Systems in Canadas

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [20883]

Caldwell, Johanna et Sinha, Vandna. 2020. «(Re) Conceptualizing Neglect: Considering the Overrepresentation of Indigenous Children in Child Welfare Systems in Canada ». Child Indicators Research, vol. 13, p. 481-512.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In this article we examine the ways in which current approaches to neglect contribute to the overrepresentation of Indigenous children in youth protection in Canada. We provide a broad overview of theoretical and legislative conceptualizations of child neglect, examining their relationships to the demonstrated overrepresentation of Indigenous children in child welfare systems in Canada. We also briefly explore the potential for the concepts of well-being and cultural safety to support a shift away from a damaging focus on a narrow understanding of child neglect that is reflected in current child welfare policies. […] In this article, discussion often focuses specifically on First Nations children and families.» (p. 483)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«The overrepresentation of Indigenous children in Canadian child welfare is driven largely by cases of neglect and risk of neglect, which are linked to conditions created by colonial policies of cultural genocide and current policies which perpetuate structural risk and family separation. The high rate of neglect cases reflects legislated and operational definitions of neglect that focus on decontextualized microlevel caregiver actions and inactions, coding structural risk resulting from settler colonialism as individual risk factors. For Indigenous children, this approach perpetuates a pattern of family separation which can result in broken cultural and community ties and reinforce the harm of residential school trauma rather than provide needed supports to assist families struggling to care for their children […]. If the overrepresentation of Indigenous children in child welfare is to decrease, a new approach to understanding and addressing neglect concerns is critical.» (p. 506)